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Sustainability – Bees and Queens for Everyone using low-cost, simple methods

[…]perceived problems in producing queens in the U.K. Overwintering bees and queens. Demystifying queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities.  Benefits of teaching apiaries. Producing bees and queens in teaching apiaries.  Queen rearing as a collective exercise. […]
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BIM 51 – Summer 2018

[…]Martin The Honey Badger’s Story – Mike TaylorI began to replace the Italian and Buckfast queens with queens from my best dark colonies over the years BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

BIBBA Conference 2018

[…]their bees and those locally. There will be information to help beekeepers to produce their own queens from stock that suits their environment, rather than relying on buying queens, possibly imported, that may not. Other beekeeping topics to suit everyone, whatever their experience or interest. We hope to help beekeepers to understand their bees better, so they can develop management […]

Cheshire Honeybee Improvement Partnership (CHIP)- CW9

[…]and propagate the native and near native honey bees. The CHIP members have formed a collective queen rearing group and are each helping other local individuals and groups to enter into selective and practical queen rearing groups in their locality   For more information please contact    […]
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Albert Knight

[…]years.   He became the voice of BIBBA and was indefatigable in promoting the native bee, queen rearing, and BIBBA.   Apart from fulfilling his secretarial duties, he produced numerous leaflets and computer programs. In 1981, following a beekeeping tour of Germany, he was involved in the establishment of an isolated mating site at Spurn Point.   At this time, he was the […]

West Devon Bee Improvement Group

[…]experienced members to: • Assess the quality of their colonies • Identify queens suitable for queen-rearing and drone-production • Learn to graft/transfer larvae for stock improvement programmes • Consolidate desirable traits by collaborative queen-rearing • Provide nucs for local beekeepers to develop into […]

Wight Bee Improvement Group

Overview of aims of the Group:  Queen Rearing will only be carried out using IOW mongrel stock, members will be encouraged to keep records of all their own stock, using only those considered to be worthy of passing on their bloodlines. At present no drone rearing is possible due to the variety of both beekeepers and imported stock. Hopefully this […]

BIM 50 – Winter 2017

[…]having ideal conditions I have had to make do with what is available I have found that larvae for queen rearing can survive outside the hive and be transported for much longer than is usually said Winter Losses – Beowulf Cooper a necessary part of strain maintenance … SICAMM Conference – Philip Denwood Finland, from 12th-17th July 2018 Locally Adapted […]

Godolphin-Cornwall

We have been queen rearing and improving stocks of local bees since 2015, based in the medieval garden and a small more private are on Godolphin Hill, we work closely with the B4 group, CBIBBG and the Cornish Bees Trelluswell group. Bob Black Beekeepers unite to save Native Bees in Cornwall Representatives of 4 bee groups came together at […]

Course Feedback

[…]in the lecture room were stimulating and informative and proved a solid basis for the practical queen rearing demonstrations that followed on the second day, along with the improved weather. As the title implies, the course had as its focus bee improvement and its essential partner, queen rearing. However, it was very wide ranging and of value to every beekeeper […]

Countryfile – on the Rame Peninsula

[…]any reason in the spring will be removed from the area and used for resources for any newly reared queens. In this way we make sure that as many colonies as possible, in the area, are putting out ‘good’ drones. The chances of good matings of any new queens produced are then as high as possible. This process is repeated […]

East Midlands further notes

[…]them) and 4 others whose expressed an interest in joining the group. So we are in flux but very stable given the significance of moving our apiary after 50 years at the other site. On Sunday we felt at last we were settled in. It was the end of a complex and time-consuming task, especially given the pandemic restrictions and […]

Abberton Native Bee Group/ Essex 4 Bees – CO2

[…]next few years and in addition to raising new queens also focus on teaching bee improvement and queen rearing. It is as important to have good tempered, healthy bees as much as native appearance. Essex Wildlife Trust is a major landowner in Essex with 69 sites over 8,400 acres and there is a willingness to allow us access to these. […]
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Bee Breeding and Queen Rearing Courses UK

[…]Events There are three types of BIBBA event to help and encourage beekeepers to raise their own queens from locally adapted colonies, rather than to use imported queens that may not suit their environment, or run the risk of importing pests and diseases. BIBBA Open Days Bee Improvement For All (BIFA) days One and two day Bee Improvement Courses If […]

2 Day Bee Improvement: Preston

[…]some of the myths Delegates will leave the course with the confidence and skills to start rearing queens and developing their own bee stocks. Who is it for? This course is aimed at beekeepers who:- currently manage several colonies know the “basics” of beekeeping, i.e. the life cycles, swarming procedure of a colony, disease recognition, etc, are able to recognise […]

2 Day Bee Improvement: Preston

[…]some of the myths Delegates will leave the course with the confidence and skills to start rearing queens and developing their own bee stocks. Who is it for? This course is aimed at beekeepers who:- currently manage several colonies know the “basics” of beekeeping, i.e. the life cycles, swarming procedure of a colony, disease recognition, etc, are able to recognise […]

BIBBA Open Day. Lampeter.

[…]by simple methods (the bees often do it for you!) Making up and maintaining nuclei Introducing queens and queen cells Cost: £18/head before 13th June, £20 afterwards. Includes refreshments and lunch. Powered by […]

BIBBA Open Day. Wakefield.

[…]by simple methods (the bees often do it for you!) Making up and maintaining nuclei Introducing queens and queen cells   Cost: £18/head before 25th May, £20 afterwards. Includes refreshments and lunch. Powered by […]

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]49 – Spr ing 2017 of the group, including the owner of the selected queen, can still continue queen rearing by their usual methods. How to find like thinking members? I have twenty beekeeping neighbours within two kilometres of my bees, their addresses are published in the CBKA annual report and balance sheet each year. I legged it around all […]

The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

[…]BIBBA, 31. Cooper, 18-21. “JFH”. British Bee Journal Dec 10 1925, p.519. Snelgrove, L.E. Queen Rearing. Bleadon: 3rd ed. 1966, 108-113. Adam, Brother. In Search of the Best Strains of Bees. Weierbach: Walmar Verlag 1966, 123-4. Cooper, 21-9. Ruttner, F., Milner, E. & Dews, J.E. The Dark European Honey Bee. Codnor: BIBBA 1990, 18-29. Dr. Robert Paxton; reported by Sweet, […]
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BIPCo 6th Annual Bee Improvement Day

[…]all those interested in improving the quality of their bees through the assessment, selection and rearing of queens and drones With guest speakers including: Roger Patterson, Deputy Chairman BIBBA * Trade Stands in attendance * Complimentary teas, coffee & biscuits * Light lunches & homemade cakes available Tickets are £8 for members and £10 for non-members for those who register […]

BIM 48 – Winter 2016/17

[…]interest. Queen raising criteria in N.E. European Russia – Anna Brandorf & Marija Ivoilova The rearing of high quality queens is an important element in bee colony reproduction. Bee Improvement – Roger Patterson One and Two Day Practical Courses BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

The black bee, an increasingly rare pearl

[…]its reproduction. In the past, domesticated bees could become wild again when swarming, when the queen left the hive with half the inhabitants to found a new swarm, and conversely, they could become domestic by passing from a natural cavity to the hive. Under the current degraded ecological conditions, the fewer natural swarms no longer last as well.  Mostly, the evolution […]

Family Member

[column-half-1] If more than one person at the same address wishes to be a BIBBA member: The first person at any address will pay the full BIBBA membership of £20 but any additional persons living at the same address can join as family members for the reduced rate of £10. If two people are paying together at the same time […]

BIM 47 – Autumn 2016

[…]declined sharply, beekeepers were forced to carefully treat the wild-hive bees more carefully. . . Queen rearing on the Isle of Man – John Evans First published in Bee Improvement No.1 1998 The SMARTBEES project – Jo Widdecombe Sustainable Management of Resilient Bee Populations Conferences and Workshops – Roger Patterson One and two day Bee Improvement courses & BIFA days […]

Work with Bangor University

[…]were collected by BIBBA breeding groups and members of SCBKA and then tested by a number of BIBBA queen rearers and the Bangor researcher Elise Keller.  Elise processed the resulting data and provided a base line, in the form of her MSc. Dissertation, from which the local queen rearers were able to assess future changes in purity across the region. […]

New Approach to the Mitotype Classification

[…]black honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera L. is today the only subspecies of honeybee which is suitable for commercial breeding in the climatic conditions of Northern Europe with long cold winters. The main problem of the black honeybee in Russia and European countries is the preservation of the indigenous gene pool purity, which is lost as a result of hybridization with […]

Irene Power “Beekeeping and a Full Time Job”

[…]practical beekeeper who maintains 15 – 20 colonies, with keen interests in honey bee health and queen rearing & honey production. Lecture Title: “Beekeeping and a full time job” The age of beekeepers in recent years has lowered, with many in full time employment, possibly with young families and other interests that have a demand on leisure time. This talk […]
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Clive de Bruyn “BIBBA in the Isle of Man 40+ years ago”

[…]with the DC area above the Port St. Mary Golf course. The drone comets that formed to chase our queen sent aloft, tethered to a couple of helium balloons, remains one of the highpoints of my beekeeping career. Our efforts culminated in watching a queen being pursued and mated at head height. …much to the indifference of my five year […]
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Dorian Pritchard “Selective breeding without inbreeding; where’s the happy medium?”

[…]lines. Breeding from the best can achieve this, but this strategy and the use of “multi-breeder queens” also accumulates recessive alleles, some of which are harmful. In the single-copy, “heterozygous” state recessives are unexpressed in females, but when “homozygous” (i.e. present as two identical copies), they can cause serious detriment. In honey bees a particular problem arises from homozygosity of […]
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Keith Pierce “Apideas: Their operation and maintenance”

[…]area of the Phoenix Park and the Liffey Valley, including the gardens of suburban Castleknock. My queens are naturally open mated, but I have been flooding the vicinity of my apiary with drones from my own native dark bees. Each year I over winter more colonies of bees than I need, keeping only the best and requeening those that do […]
Read more » Keith Pierce “Apideas: Their operation and maintenance”

Eoghan Mac Giolla Coda “Producing Honey Under Difficult Conditions”

[…]variant of the dark bee provides good yields even in poor summers. Due to its conservative brood-rearing nature, the native Irish honey bee is able to respond rapidly to unpredictable and intermittent honey flows and is very thrifty with regard to stored honey. Other characteristics of the native bee that play key roles in honey production are flying behavior, temperament, […]
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Paul Cross “Development of a miniature vibration energy harvester for battery-less tracking of honey bees”

[…]their environment. To date, no technology exists to effectively track such things as foraging, queen and drone flight paths or enable the long-term evaluation of navigation loss of bees exposed to potentially harmful pesticides such as neonicotinoids. This is because the monitoring of bee movements requires effective radio-tracking in the field, which is currently constrained by transmitter size, battery life […]
Read more » Paul Cross “Development of a miniature vibration energy harvester for battery-less tracking of honey bees”

Pete Sutcliffe – “The hive as a processing centre”

[…]Branch and County Archivist. He is currently leading a county-wide working group on selective queen-rearing. Lecture Title: “The hive as a processing centre” “A hive of activity” as the saying goes! To ensure the colony survives in a healthy state, honey bees collect everything they need from the surrounding area in the form of relatively simple, readily available, natural products. […]
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The health and status of the feral honeybee population of the UK

[…]the feral population. Only 12 colonies were seen to persist for 2.5 years, although the original queen swarmed or was replaced during this time. Feral colonies were shown to be genetically similar to local managed colonies, differing, albeit significantly, by only 2.3%. The implications for feral honeybee health are explored. Feral colonies are highly introgressed and do not represent remnant […]
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Huw Evans “Electronic monitoring as a tool for better beekeeping and queen breeding”

[…]humidity, hive weight and apiary weather conditions. The data collected offers a beekeeper/queen breeder a powerful tool to examine the colony and queen conditions without disturbing the bees. Weight data can be used to calculate the “adjusted production figure” (average harvested by each apiary minus the harvest of each hive) for each individual hive in order to avoid mistakes in […]
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Where do I find out about local groups or get support to start one?

[…]up local queen rearing groups.  click to see active groups here If you are already breeding or rearing queens with the aim of selecting for native traits but have not registered as a group we would be pleased if you would consider registering by contacting either the groups coordinator or the web master. If there is no group local to […]

NatBIP News No2

[…]area’. How long before I can select a ‘breeder queen’? Much has been written about queen rearing but surprisingly little about assessment of colonies and selecting which queen to breed from. What there is, can be off-putting as, often, such a long-winded process is recommended that few of us would ever reach an end-result. Particularly in the first season, one […]

Section 2.1 – How NatBIP will work

[…]of our colonies. Producing the next generation From our completed record cards, we can choose the queen or queens to rear further queens from. Some will want to rear numerous queens from a few selected queens, others may prefer just one or two offspring from numerous queens, perhaps up to half of available stocks. It is important not to narrow […]

Webinars – Summary

Recordings of the majority of webinars are also available on our YouTube Channel Don’t forget to sign up here, for free, to learn more about our future […]

BIBBA Monthly – December 2020

[…]– Playing your part" 23.       Roger Patterson          “Understanding queen rearing methods” March 2.         Roger Patterson          “Bee Improvement. How I did it” 9.         Keith Pierce                 "Breeding and improving our native bee. A pragmatic approach, even if you are surrounded by non-native bees" 16.       Kevin Thorn                 “Working Together to Improve Local Stock” 23.       Roger […]

Conserving black bees

[…]to improve the native strain consider­ably.”2 A local farmer, Niall McNeill, was trained in queen rearing. Queens and nucs were sent regularly to the mainland. In 1945, Eva Crane, Direc­tor of the International Bee Research Association in the U.K., recorded in her diary a visit to Colonsay and Oronsay and her interest in find­ing Black Bees on the islands, which […]

Webinars – Season Two

Tuesday 18th August 7:30pm – Roger Patterson – “Dead Bees Don’t Buzz – Surviving the Winter “ Presentation:  “Dead Bees Don’t Buzz – Surviving the Winter “ View Recording – Roger Patterson – “Dead Bees Don’t Buzz – Surviving the Winter “ Tuesday 25th August 7:30pm – Lynfa Davies – “The Mystery of Mating” Presentation:  “The Mystery of Mating”. View […]