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A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing Nuclei

[…]Beachaire (The Irish Beekeeper) The reader may groan and sigh, “not another queen-rearing method,” and I agree that there seems to be an endless number of ways of rearing queens, including the Miller, Hopkins, Alley, Harden and Harding methods.  Although sometimes seen as a black art, queen-rearing is an important part of beekeeping, and every beekeeper should have access to […]
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Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]and look carefully to ensure that one of her legs is not being cut off as well. If this occurs the queen will be superseded. The queen uses her forelegs as a caliper to measure the diameter of each cell before she lays in it. This determines whether a fertile female egg or an unfertilised male egg is laid, depending […]

Margaret Murdin “Bee Genetics Explained” – “Understanding the Queen

[…]They know she is important, but how much do they actually know about her? In simple terms the queen is the mother of  the colony, but there is much more to it than that. Although the egg of a queen and worker are identical, they become very different creatures depending on their diet in the larval stage, that only lasts […]
Read more » Margaret Murdin “Bee Genetics Explained” – “Understanding the Queen

Huw Evans “Electronic monitoring as a tool for better beekeeping and queen breeding”

[…]humidity, hive weight and apiary weather conditions. The data collected offers a beekeeper/queen breeder a powerful tool to examine the colony and queen conditions without disturbing the bees. Weight data can be used to calculate the “adjusted production figure” (average harvested by each apiary minus the harvest of each hive) for each individual hive in order to avoid mistakes in […]
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Roger Patterson

[…]purposes. Roger concentrates on teaching the practical aspects of beekeeping that includes queen rearing and bee improvement. He is a prolific lecturer, demonstrator and writer, being author of books, booklets and a regular contributor to the bee press. Roger now owns and maintains Dave Cushman’s website www.dave-cushman.net, that is widely recognised as one of the world’s most comprehensive beekeeping websites. He is the […]

“Bee Improvement for All” (BIFA) Days

[…]assessment and queen selection need more attention than many beekeepers give them. This does mean rearing queens, but the bees give us many opportunities during the summer to raise new queens with little effort needed by us. “Bee Improvement for all” is a one day course that is designed to help beekeepers use these opportunities to improve their bees, as […]

Bee Improvement and Bee Breeding Groups

[…]local group can pool expertise of different disciplines… honey bee management, record keeping, queen rearing, equipment making, administration, etc. More beekeepers means there are more colonies to select material from and to provide good quality drones, as well as maximising the number of colonies under management, evaluation and study.Groups can liaise with one another and with scientific institutions if they wish. […]

Jutland Visit

[…]being shown the house were entertained with wine. On Sunday, after a long journey, we visited the Queen rearing establishment of Poul Eric Soresen. He first showed us his beeswax business where he takes in other beekeepers frames and extracts the wax for which he charges. All the frames are cleaned with caustic soda and then spray washed and kept […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]days which, for a period, is able to lay predominantly diploid worker eggs. From these eggs true queens capable of being mated can be raised, re-establishing queenrightness in the colony. The present situation Apiculture has been practiced in Europe and Asia throughout recorded history. For most of the time the honey bees kept in any country would be indigenous to […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner