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Steve Rose Queen Rearing

[…]so that the queen pheromones have normal access to the box again. Download pdf of full article:Queen Rearing Method – Steve Rose July […]

Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

[…]Series - Queen Rearing (2019) BIBBA Articles on Queen Rearing John Harding Queen Rearing Steve Rose Queen Rearing Methods for Rearing and Selection of Queens A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing […]

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]frame and watch her while the other prepares the necessary equipment for clipping and marking. My method is to catch the queen from behind by both wings as she walks across the comb with the thumb and index finger of the right hand. She is then transferred to the left hand where she is gently held by the thorax between […]

John Harding Queen Rearing

[…]small or large beekeeping operations Queen cells can be staggered by date for a more manageable method Any method of cell raising can be used It’s easy to get to the centre nucleus where the cells are Disturbance to the two main bodies is limited to normal inspections The nuclei can be split, and given a queen cell when queen […]

Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

[…]extra costs and just a little extra effort and it gives you the best change to get the best queens. The method is integrated in the normal beekeeping practice and integrates with swarm control, varroa control and harvesting honey. I have used the method myself for many years with a lot of success and I taught it to many beekeepers […]
Read more » Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing Nuclei

[…]could also treat the colony with Apibioxal for varroa control. Concluding Remarks Although this method of queen production may not suit every operation, I think it is an invaluable addition to the range of bee-breeding techniques available to the beekeeper.  It’s an excellent means of producing good quality queens and of producing nuclei headed by new queens.  As a bonus, […]
Read more » A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing Nuclei

BIM 36 – Summer 2011

[…]Cushman – Roger Patterson John Dews Obituary – various Book Review – Philip Denwood The Rose Hive Method: Challenging Conventional Beekeeping, by Tim Rowe. BIBBA Trustees BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]and health, which in turn prompts the beekeeper to administer even more intervention. Methods of queen raising produce bees selected for maximum honey production under artificial conditions rather than adaptation to any particular local environment. 2. Most amateur conventional beekeepers will not subject their bees to such intense stress, and some may even practise what Brian refers to as ‘let-alone’ […]

Margaret Murdin “Bee Genetics Explained” – “Understanding the Queen

[…]They know she is important, but how much do they actually know about her? In simple terms the queen is the mother of  the colony, but there is much more to it than that. Although the egg of a queen and worker are identical, they become very different creatures depending on their diet in the larval stage, that only lasts […]
Read more » Margaret Murdin “Bee Genetics Explained” – “Understanding the Queen

Huw Evans “Electronic monitoring as a tool for better beekeeping and queen breeding”

[…]humidity, hive weight and apiary weather conditions. The data collected offers a beekeeper/queen breeder a powerful tool to examine the colony and queen conditions without disturbing the bees. Weight data can be used to calculate the “adjusted production figure” (average harvested by each apiary minus the harvest of each hive) for each individual hive in order to avoid mistakes in […]
Read more » Huw Evans “Electronic monitoring as a tool for better beekeeping and queen breeding”

Colony Increase – The Roger Patterson Method

[…]are several techniques that can be used on their own if needed. The author has used the whole method or parts successfully for over 40 years. Although it has been used in the UK, there is no reason why it can’t be successfully implemented throughout the world. It is suitable for all beekeepers, whether small scale where selective parts of […]
Read more » Colony Increase – The Roger Patterson Method

Jutland Visit

[…]heat the boiler for his house. Poul raises over 2000 queens annually although he sells many virgin queens. He has many lines of queens and raises them for gentleness, quietness on the comb and he also tests for hygienic behaviour by the freeze brood method. He says he will raise 30 sister queens but after selection only retains about 5. […]

Downloads Old

[…]The original table written in 1995, but it has one error. It has been rewritten to include other methods of producing queen cells.  BIBBA Morph30  Download  This spreadsheet was originated by BIBBA, thought to be authored by Angus Stokes.  Veterinary Medicines Recording Form   veterinary medicines […]

Methods for Rearing and Selection of Queens

[…]and quality control of mating stations. Recommendations for the handling and quality control of queens complete the queen rearing section. The improvement of colony traits usually depends on a comparative testing of colonies. Standardized recommendations for the organization of performance tests and the measurement of the most common selection characters are presented. Statistical methods and data preconditions for the estimation […]

BBOBI Group – March April 2019 Newsletter

[…]is ready to be deployed. The first modest batch of AMM grafts have been taken to standardise the method and educate the core team. Queen cages are being prepared, either plastic bought at the Tradex or Benton Cages constructed from timber. Mating preparations have started; making Queen Castles and attending lectures on Apidea management Activities we have planned: Swarm control […]

Caging Virgin Queens

[…]food type (sugar candy, honey, or both). Ten queens were tested in each of the 12 combinations. Queens were reared using standard beekeeping methods (Doolittle/grafting) and emerged from their cells into vials held in an incubator at 34C. All 12 combinations gave high survival (90 or 100%) for three days but only one method (wooden cage, with attendants, honey) gave […]

Paul Cross “Development of a miniature vibration energy harvester for battery-less tracking of honey bees”

[…]Uganda and Tanzania, discrimination of honey bee races in North Wales (in conjunction with Steve Rose of BIBBA), identifying links between racial purity and disease resistance and finally two projects developing micro-electronic bee trackers. Lecture Title: “Development of a miniature vibration energy harvester for battery-less tracking of honey bees” The recent global decline in honey bee colonies has ignited efforts […]
Read more » Paul Cross “Development of a miniature vibration energy harvester for battery-less tracking of honey bees”

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

[…](Swarm cell or emergency cell)? To name a few. 3) What set up of starter colony will you have? Queenless, Queen Right or temporarily queenless then queen right e.g a Cloake board (there are several variations of each of these). 4) Will you use finisher colonies and/or an incubator to increase capacity – not needed except to produce a lot […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

Work with Bangor University

[…]time series study of colony wing morphometry in the study area, and to compare alternative methods such as landmark analysis with the current method of calculation of simple indices indicating native or non-native status. (DNA analysis) To evaluate the relative reliability of wing morphometric methods by comparing trait characteristics with DNA analyses, by characterizing the mitotype at the COI-COII locus […]

BIM 41 – Spring 2013

News from North Wales – Steve Rose We currently have eight small queen rearing groups situated in Denbighshire, Flintshire, Wrexham and just over the border in West Shropshire. AGM Proposal 2012 – Will Messenger A proposal to modify the aims of BIBBA – no, not another one! The Native Bee – Dorian Pritchard The Native Bee shows its mettle: 2012 […]

BIM 39 – Autumn 2012

[…]Messenger Providing Breeding Material – Albert Knight Meet the Members – Eddie O’Sullivan Queen Rearing workshop – Mike Thornley Scottish Bee Breeding – Mike Thornley Experiments with Morphometry – Iain Harley SICAMM Conference – Steve Rose BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

BIM 38 – Spring 2012

[…]Mike Saunders Scottish Centenary Conference Sedbergh Breeding Group – Andrew Royce North Wales Queen Rearing – Steve Rose BIBBA Scottish Conference BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

2 Day Bee Improvement: Preston

[…]queen cell using grafting, cell punching, cell plugs and the Miller method Clipping and marking queens Changing queens in colonies and queen introduction techniques. Drone production Making up queen mating colonies and nuclei. Getting queens mated and mating control. Equipment required – buying, making, improvising or modifying. Dispelling some of the myths Delegates will leave the course with the confidence […]

2 Day Bee Improvement: Preston

[…]queen cell using grafting, cell punching, cell plugs and the Miller method Clipping and marking queens Changing queens in colonies and queen introduction techniques. Drone production Making up queen mating colonies and nuclei. Getting queens mated and mating control. Equipment required – buying, making, improvising or modifying. Dispelling some of the myths Delegates will leave the course with the confidence […]

Course Feedback

[…]demonstrations of colony preparation, queen introduction, the selection and grafting of larvae and queen cell raising and queen mating using mini-nucs. The presentation of the course gave attendees plenty of opportunity for discussion and practice and, without exception, everyone benefitted from the course both in terms of a deeper understanding of the subject and of confidence to practise the skills […]

Downloads

[…]or Cupkit Cellplug Box. The original table written in 1995; It has been rewritten to include other methods of producing queen cells. DOWNLOAD  BIBBA Morph30  This spreadsheet was originated by BIBBA, thought to be authored by Angus Stokes. DOWNLOAD  Veterinary Medicines Recording […]

BIBBA Monthly – September 2019

Queen Rearing – my preferred method by Jo Widdicombe Setting Up a Breeding Conservation Group BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

NatBIP News No2

[…]Rearing guidance If you didn’t catch this BIBBA webinar recently – “Understanding Queen Rearing Methods” by Roger Patterson. It provides a really solid overview of many of the queen rearing techniques open to us as beekeepers – plenty of food for thought. Don’t forget to join us on Facebook and share your journey and ask questions to get the most […]

Bucks Berks & Oxon Bee Improvement (BBOBI ) – RG9

[…]We encourage beekeepers to value and nurture their drones with the same care they would their queens. Encourage the use of British hybrid queens We want to encourage people to buy British and support their fellow beekeepers by buying locally adapted British hybrids. We want to discourage the use of the so called ‘Buckfast bee’ whose name has become synonymous […]
Read more » Bucks Berks & Oxon Bee Improvement (BBOBI ) – RG9

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

[…]may still swarm! Simple queen propagation – there’s no need to worry initially, about complex methods of queen rearing (unless you want to). Simple splits can raise a lot of queens. When I first became a commercial Beekeeper, I had only 6 colonies but by splitting each of these, I had 32 by the end of the season (not much […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

BBOBI Group – April 2020 Newsletter

[…]and offering mated queens or even nucs to you in late June. We have been researching and making queen banks in the hope we can hold our best queens a little longer this year. Another success from last year was the social gatherings at a local pub, this started in April and unless we can meet via a Zoom session, […]

Conserving black bees

[…]to improve the native strain consider­ably.”2 A local farmer, Niall McNeill, was trained in queen rearing. Queens and nucs were sent regularly to the mainland. In 1945, Eva Crane, Direc­tor of the International Bee Research Association in the U.K., recorded in her diary a visit to Colonsay and Oronsay and her interest in find­ing Black Bees on the islands, which […]

Webinars – Summary

Recordings of the majority of webinars are also available on our YouTube Channel Don’t forget to sign up here, for free, to learn more about our future […]

Section 3.1 – The Selection of Local Stock

[…]of ‘inbreeding’ and maintaining genetic diversity. To allow us to select the most desirable queens to rear a new generation of queens from, and to replace, or remove from the area, undesirable queens, we need to use a system of record-keeping that allows us, over time, to build up a picture of the qualities of each queen. Beekeepers are often […]

East Midlands 1998

[…]days. The care of queens after emergence is important, failure to take simple steps can result in queens dying. Once the queens have emerged they must have immediate access to liquid honey or soft candy, and the cell case removed to give them more room in the cage, and to prevent them entering the cell and getting trapped. Conclusion One […]

Dover and Districts BKA Q rearing support group – CT4

[…]and husbandry techniques delivered as Zoom meetings. Individual members are guided to choose a queen rearing method appropriate for their circumstances and skill level; individual or small group support will be given as they undertake their queen rearing. There is no charge for this course, but participants must be a member of Dover & District BKA and, if excess queens […]
Read more » Dover and Districts BKA Q rearing support group – CT4

NatBIP News No6

[…]NatBIP News volunteers are a persistent bunch! Phil – our beginner – has relied on the natural method of queen rearing, using the bees swarming instinct to produce new queens. By performing an artificial swarm, he was able to harvest early swarm cells, manipulate them and the parent colony to provide potential new queens.  This really is the easiest, and least […]

BIBBA Books

[…]apiary to spread and nurture the craft of beekeeping. Queen Rearing Made Easy: The Punched Cell Method Raising queens using the Punched Cell method has been in use for over a century. Richard Smailes published “Raise Your Own Queens by the Punched Cell Method” about half a century ago. Little has been published since. Few have continued to practice the method. It’s […]

Sandringham Report 2021

[…]This did somewhat better than the JH unit for a while. We also split a colony to provide a queenless queen cell starter unit; this worked well initially but like the other two units failed to start a single graft cell when we introduced grafts on 16th August. It is not clear why this should have been so, but the […]