Queen Rearing and Bee Improvement Courses

BIBBA are committed to helping beekeepers to improve their bees and those of the surrounding area, by raising queens from their better colonies and culling the poorer ones. Bee Improvement should be of interest to all beekeepers and for a number of reasons including temper, quietness on the combs and suitability to the locality. The…

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Queen Rearing Timetable

queen cells

This Microsoft XL file was written by Angus Stokes and Albert Knight and provides an interactive way to prepare timetables for using the Jenter or Cupkit Cellplug Box. With a bit of tweaking it can be used for other methods of cell raising.

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Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

Photo by Roger Patterson Queen Rearing Methods There are so many techniques of queen rearing, and so much has been written about them, that it may seem unwise to add any more. Studying too many methods can be a source of much confusion and leave one overwhelmed and unsure of how to proceed. Like most…

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BIBBA Queen Rearing Table (Tom’s Table)

The original Microsoft Excel file was written by Angus Stokes and Albert Knight to provide an interactive way to prepare timetables for using the Jenter or Cupkit Cellplug Box. This is a more comprehensive version of “Tom’s Table” that has been rewritten by Roger Patterson in 2015, to include other methods of producing queen cells…

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Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

After my study of Forestry and Nature Conservation I began beekeeping and started as a professional pollinating beekeeper. I worked for Wageningen University and Research Center for the bee research unit and for 8 years as Managing Director for the Dutch Beekeepers Association. I wrote the book “Beekeeping for Everyone” (in Dutch) and now I’m…

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John Harding Queen Rearing

The main purpose of this systemis its versatility and to have an additional use so you always double its value in purpose, and it’s not lying around for the best part of the year unused. Given the choice honeybees prefer vertical narrow empty spaces with unlimited depth, and just enough space to build 5 or6 combs side by side…

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Queens – an example of collaboration between beekeepers, by Roger Patterson

For myself and my local association, Wisborough Green BKA (WGBKA) in West Sussex, where I am Apiary Manager, I usually produce at least 100 queens per year. This is mainly to replace poorer queens in honey producing colonies, provide queens to head nucs for new beekeepers and for members who need queens for a variety of reasons. We try to encourage members to rear their own queens, but sometimes their bees need requeening with better stock. As many beekeepers only have a couple of colonies, they may not have bees that are good to propagate from. A BKA teaching apiary can be a genetic resource to distribute good local stock from.
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