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John Dew’s Views – the Best Bee

[…]can cope with the environmental changes taking place as a result of agricultural practice, eg, the oil seed rape crop, cereal ‘deserts’ and other major changes such as global warming that may be imminent. These people should take note that the Dark bee is the most adaptable of all the honeybee races, its territory of natural distribution ranging from the […]

Why does BIBBA advise buying bees and queens locally?

[…]can vary considerably even over a relatively short distance. An example is that one area may have oil seed rape as the main nectar source, yet only a few miles away it might be heather. The former needs a bee that builds up much earlier in the season than the latter. Adaptation takes a little time to achieve. Local bees […]
Read more » Why does BIBBA advise buying bees and queens locally?

Why does BIBBA advise buying bees and queens locally?

[…]can vary considerably even over a relatively short distance. An example is that one area may have oil seed rape as the main nectar source, yet only a few miles away it might be heather. The former needs a bee that builds up much earlier in the season than the latter. Adaptation takes a little time to achieve. Local bees […]
Read more » Why does BIBBA advise buying bees and queens locally?

John Dew’s Views – the Best Bee

[…]can cope with the environmental changes taking place as a result of agricultural practice, eg, the oil seed rape crop, cereal ‘deserts’ and other major changes such as global warming that may be imminent. These people should take note that the Dark bee is the most adaptable of all the honeybee races, its territory of natural distribution ranging from the […]

NatBIP News No 7

[…]Bob Flowerdew said the other day, on Gardeners Question Time, “The reason we do not save seed from F1 hybrid plants is that the offspring produced will consist of some good plants and some bad”. Consistency cannot be produced from hybridised seeds or, in our case, from hybridised bees. Picking up the pieces Our task is to move from the […]

Section 3.1 – The Selection of Local Stock

[…]between colonies. Many beekeepers like their colonies to be strong in the spring to benefit from oil-seed rape crops and other spring flows early in the season. This is a trait that could be selected for. Health and Brood pattern are usually only assessed if something of note is spotted, for example, an extra good brood pattern with large quantities […]

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Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]apples. Our main honey crop is now the inferior and rather troublesome product of the ubiquitous oilseed rape. There have been pronounced changes in the climate of these islands during the past 10,000 years. Following the Ice Age there was a warm period when the land was colonised, or perhaps re-colonised by honey bees and when for a time the […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner