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Honey bee conservation

[…]preserve honeybee endemic diversity through conservation programs. They’ve realized that healthy natural populations can act as a reservoir against losses due to occasional diseases. Dedicated conservation programs will eventually provide various honeybee strains and traits that are suitable for sustainable beekeeping. In a newly published study, researchers analysed the relationships between individuals of the honey bee subspecies Apis mellifera mellifera […]

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]book. If the queen is present, she will usually be found on an inner frame surface where she would naturally have sought refuge from the light. Running queens are the most difficult of all to find but as long as the queen is confined to one box there should be no great difficulty. When she has the run of two […]

“Bee Improvement for All” (BIFA) Days

[…]on buying them. Deciding which colonies to use queen cells from and which queens to cull. Using natural queen cells the bees build. Producing “Artificial” queen cells for those who want more queens. Changing queens in colonies. Making up mating nuclei. Getting queens mated. Working with other beekeepers and the local BKA. [/column-half-1][column-half-2]There will be plenty of information on colony […]

Native Honey Bees

[…]Alps from the Atlantic to the Urals, where they evolved in isolation, having been cut off by such natural barriers as mountains, water and ice. With many of the “pure” stocks of all sub species worldwide there has been a certain amount of introgression, due to bees being introduced into parts where they are not native and “tweaking” by breeders. […]

John Dew’s Views – the Best Bee

[…]take note that the Dark bee is the most adaptable of all the honeybee races, its territory of natural distribution ranging from the Mediterranean coast of France to Southern Scandinavia (and in the care of man as far north as the Arctic Circle) and from the humid and largely temperate climate of the Atlantic seaboard of Western Europe to the […]

What is Apis mellifera mellifera?

[…]Northern and Central Europe north of the Alps and Carpathians to the Urals and beyond.   The natural range of A.m.m. coincides with the 15-20° zone. (Copyright D.J.Pritchard). From an article on the SICAMM […]

John Harding Queen Rearing

[…]colonies in the towers will probably need no winter feeding The colonies in the towers will have a natural nest situation with the entrance at the bottom and food above the brood There will be a natural cycle of empty combs from the central box being replaced with combs of unsealed larvae. The empty combs will be laid in by […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]mellifica” (1761) of Linnaeus is but one small section of the Dark European Honey Bee whose natural territory included the island of Corsica and ranged from the Pyrenees over Europe north of the Alps to the Ural Mountains in the East and included Great Britain and Ireland and southern Sweden. Although there is no historical record of honey bees in […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

A Native Dark Bee Project

[…]and graft queens for 2011. A batch of virgins was produced using the same process as before and naturally mated with the drones from the previous years A.m.m. mothers. (It would NOT have been possible to breed pure queens from the previous year’s out-mated mothers.) Unfortunately the weather that summer was very poor and all virgins were lost or became […]

Improving bees by raising your own queens

[…]should prepare attendees for producing many more queens on a regular basis if required. The use of natural queen cells will also be discussed. Attendees should know the "basics" of beekeeping, i.e., the life cycles, swarming procedure of a colony, disease recognition, etc, and be able to see eggs and young larvae. This is not a course for raw beginners, […]

Dark Bee Conservation Group – WF5

West Yorkshire group aiming to promote and improve the local bee whilst preserving the natural honey bee diversity, reduce colony losses and reduce the dependence on therapeutic and chemical treatments. contact Stuart […]

Ardnamurchan Jan 2016

[…]August and little sunshine. Queen rearing was therefore difficult as the colonies were depleted of natural stores and the weather was mostly too cold for mating, even on rare fine days. We hope for better conditions in 2016 and the successful rearing and mating of a larger number of queens. Demand for Amm queens is strong in Scotland where there […]

Controlled Mating and Hygienic Behaviour

[…]higher in the colonies of the instrumentally inseminated queens than in the colonies of the naturally-mated queens. However, the hygiene levels in the naturally-mated colonies were encouragingly high and indicate that supplying beekeepers with naturally-mated queens, or virgin queens to mate locally, can result in colonies with high levels of hygiene. Full text pdf Keywords Apis mellifera, hygienic behaviour, instrumental […]

Caging Virgin Queens

Comparing Alternative Methods for Holding Virgin Honey Bee Queens for One Week in Mailing Cages before Mating Gianluigi Bigio , Christoph Grüter, Francis L. W. Ratnieks  Published: November 16, 2012 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0050150 Abstract In beekeeping, queen honey bees are often temporarily kept alive in cages. We determined the survival of newly-emerged virgin honey bee queens every day for seven days […]

University of Plymouth Project

[…]in partnership with B4 (a community interest company: Bringing Back Black Bees) and funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) have started a 4 year PhD project to investigate suggestions from bee-keepers that different sub-species have a suite of different behaviours and characteristics in comparison to other sub-species, and further that these might be highly regional in their nature. […]

Michael Maunsell “The Drone – More to its life than we may think?”

[…]Breeding Group. My beekeeping philosophy is quite simple – start with your own local bees, use natural selection (survival of the fittest, this has brought them to where they are) then progress with artificial selection, using comprehensive colony records. Lecture Title: “The Drone – More to its life than we may think?” Purpose of this talk is to create a […]
Read more » Michael Maunsell “The Drone – More to its life than we may think?”

Mike Saunders “A current attempt to recover Apis mellifera mellifera from mongrelised stocks in the Welsh Borders”

[…]the Group’s breeding programme and its arduous task of learning about queen and drone-rearing, natural mating and instrumental insemination, colony assessment and bee morphometry and breeder evaluation and selection. Lecture Title: “A current attempt to recover Apis mellifera mellifera from mongrelised stocks in the Welsh Borders” Achieving sustained and demonstrable bee improvement in only a few years requires the use […]
Read more » Mike Saunders “A current attempt to recover Apis mellifera mellifera from mongrelised stocks in the Welsh Borders”

June 2022 BIBBA Monthly

[…]to ‘mixed farming’, where crops and livestock are grown in rotation to rebuild soil fertility naturally. The Report also suggests that we can farm in harmony with nature as well as increasing the amount of land for woodland creation (in line with Climate Change Committee recommendations) by integrating more trees into the farmed landscape and through agroforestry. Such a change […]

Improving bees by raising your own queens

[…]should prepare attendees for producing many more queens on a regular basis if required. The use of natural queen cells will also be discussed. Attendees should know the "basics" of beekeeping, i.e., the life cycles, swarming procedure of a colony, disease recognition, etc, and be able to see eggs and young larvae. This is not a course for raw beginners, […]

NatBIP News No8

[…]time it happens. BIBBA opposes the Importation of Honey Bees and Queens (Here are 15 reasons why) Natural selection is a useful tool in bee improvement, and if beekeepers can combine that with ‘artificial selection’ by the beekeeper, we can start to shape the population for the better. Fewer imports make that process so much easier, as new, often unsuitable, […]

Let’s Go Beekeeping!

[…]beekeeping knowledge. During August 2021, I was fortunate enough to film with Roger in his natural environment down in West Sussex and - between throwing sticks for Rosie - Roger, Martina and myself were able to record lots of footage that I’ve been editing over the winter. So far, we have 8 videos available on our YouTube channel: Preparing supers […]

Why do the bees rear so many drones?

[…]were to arise in some colony that favoured the production of many drones. That colony would then naturally produce many drones. The genes that carry that mutation, which we can call the ‘many-drones’ genes, would be carried by those drones (which are, almost but not quite, genetically identical to their mother queen), and those drones being numerous, the chances of […]

Sandringham Report 2021

[…]HRH the Prince of Wales’s objectives to manage the Estate as a fully organic enterprise farming naturally and sustainably. One of our Trustees, Brian Holdcroft assessed the Proposal and after discussion by the Committee of Trustees, it was agreed that it would make an excellent new Special Apiary Project and fit within our strategic sustainable bees objective, Approval was given […]

Lune Valley New Breeding Apiary

[…]inspecting colonies three or four times a year unless really necessary letting the bees swarm naturally and collecting the swarms rather than inspecting regularly to try to prevent swarming not treating with chemicals letting the bees draw out their own comb rather than using foundation only taking off honey in the spring if there is a genuine surplus avoiding artificial […]