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What is Apis mellifera mellifera?

What is Apis mellifera mellifera? Apis mellifera mellifera, Linnaeus 1758 is a subspecies and northern geographical race of Apis mellifera, the western honeybee. It may be subdivided into many local ecotypes. Its various vernacular names include: “Dark European Honeybee” (English), “L’abeille noire” (French), “Die dunkle Biene” (German) and “Det mörka Nordiska Biet” (Swedish). Apis mellifera mellifera is distinguished from other […]

Mike Saunders “A current attempt to recover Apis mellifera mellifera from mongrelised stocks in the Welsh Borders”

[…]are nearly-enough from a single race, so that they breed true. In Britain, the native race Apis mellifera mellifera (A.m.m), is argued to be the best one to use, but it is hard to find in proven near-pure form except in a few parts of the Celtic fringe. This talk describes an on-going attempt to use selective breeding to move […]
Read more » Mike Saunders “A current attempt to recover Apis mellifera mellifera from mongrelised stocks in the Welsh Borders”

The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

[…]modern specimens of Dark Bees from the UK and Ireland fit into the genetic specification of Apis mellifera mellifera (see e.g. the article by Pritchard). Characterisitics of British A.m.m. Physical characters Cooper, 19865 Bees “black”. Long abdominal overhairs. Characteristic wing type. Genetically large size. Behavioural characters I will now discuss some of the behavioural characteristics of the British A.m.m. as […]
Read more » The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

History

[…]bees, as one cannot breed true from hybrids. Many saw his policies of using purebred Apis mellifera mellifera bees and his condemnation of hybrids, as a direct challenge to those of Brother Adam, whose life time work had been to produce a hybrid bee, known as the Buckfast bee. Not only that, but the declaration by Beo that the native […]

Links

[…]Honey Bee Society To promote the conservation, study, improvement and re-introduction of Apis mellifera mellifera (Native Irish Honey Bee), throughout the island of Ireland. SNHBS – Scottish Native Honey Bee Society Promoting the conservation, maintenance, breeding and study of the Scottish Native Honey Bee. National Honey Show Honey and beeswax showing as well as lectures, trade stands and educational stands. […]

Male Fitness of Honeybee Colonies

Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) have an extreme polyandrous mating system. Worker offspring of 19 naturally mated queens was genotyped with DNA microsatellites, to estimate male reproductive success of 16 drone producing colonies. This allowed for estimating the male mating success on both the colony level and the level of individual […]

Honey bee conservation

[…]study, researchers analysed the relationships between individuals of the honey bee subspecies Apis mellifera mellifera in a conservation centre, a drone congregation area, and the surrounding populations. Honeybees have a very complex mating system in which drones and virgin queens meet mid-air to mate in areas that have been named drone congregation areas. Drones assembled in such a drone congregation […]

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]at the earliest possible opportunity. Brood nest surrounded by pollen It is customary in A. m. mellifera bees for the brood nest to be surrounded with freshly harvested pollen at back, front, above, at the sides and sometimes even below the brood, so that usually a pollen-filled frame is encountered before eggs are found. When this frame of pollen is […]

Laesoe 2004

[…]and morphometric criteria. One canton, Glarus in the east of the country, has granted A. m. mellifera protected status; the federal government has refused to extend this status nationwide but has recognised A. m. mellifera as an endangered subspecies and supports certain programmes related to it. The other bees kept in Switzerland are Carniolans, Italians and Buckfasts. Other presentations were […]

Native Honey Bees

[…]Bee – Apis mellifera mellifera (Amm) It is fairly certain that the Dark European Honey Bee, Apis mellifera mellifera, has been native to mainland Britain since before the closing of the Channel Landbridge, when sea levels rose following the last Ice Age. They became isolated and adapted to the different conditions they found themselves in. Amm are native to the […]

John Dew’s Views – the Best Bee

[…]1988) is that the Western honeybee probably originated and developed as a successful species (Apis mellifera) in the central part of North Africa. It then spread from this area in three directions: southward, to colonise Africa as far as the Cape, with sub-species evolving in response to differing environmental needs, to the east, to colonise the Middle East and south […]

Terry Hitchman

[…]beekeeping and has been a member of BIBBA for approximately 20 years. He purchased his first Apis mellifera mellifera virgin queen at the East Midlands bee breeding group’s Locko Park open day in 1992 and now has 25 colonies of native or near native bees. He has been a member of the Stratford-upon-Avon Beekeepers’ Association committee for 19 years, Chairman […]

Colonsay a honey bee haven

[…]force on 1 January and will make it an offence to keep any honeybees on the islands except Apis mellifera mellifera, whose hardiness allows them to survive the harsh climate of Scotland’s west coast. Beekeeper Andrew Abrahams has campaigned for the islands to be recognised as a sanctuary for the species. He began keeping bees on Colonsay 35 years ago, […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]itself when transferred to a different kind of environment. The Dark European Honey bee, Apis mellifera mellifera, is fairly uniform over its whole range, having had but a comparatively short time in which regional varieties could evolve, but even in this race differences can be observed between strains. In France, where the bee has been domiciled longest, there are distinct […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

A Native Dark Bee Project

[…]bee breeder Brother Adam, to have eradicated the native subspecies of dark European honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera from our Isles. To make up the losses imports of foreign subspecies, which had started in 1859, were increased. Since then regular imports of Apis m. carnica, A.m. ligustica and other races have become the norm. Crosses between these bees have given a […]

East Midlands Bee Improvement Group-NG11

[…]NG13   The aim of the BIBBA East Midlands Bee Improvement Group is to breed near native Apis mellifera mellifera (Amm) queens of the best local genetic stock. Then making these queens available to members and ultimately to other beekeepers in the region, who wish to establish this sub species in their own apiaries.   During the Summer of 2020 […]

Galtee Bee Breeding Group

[…]object of conservation, study and improvement of the native strains of dark European Honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera in the Galtee/Vee valley and surrounding areas of South Tipperary. In the first year we had only four members and increased our membership only very gradually during the early years. After the BIBBA Conference in our area in 1996 we decided to invite […]

Eoghan Mac Giolla Coda “Producing Honey Under Difficult Conditions”

[…]winters are generally mild, summer conditions are often cool and damp. The European dark bee, Apis mellifera mellifera, has evolved to cope with these conditions. Scale hive data and honey yields reveal that the Irish variant of the dark bee provides good yields even in poor summers. Due to its conservative brood-rearing nature, the native Irish honey bee is able […]
Read more » Eoghan Mac Giolla Coda “Producing Honey Under Difficult Conditions”

Colony Assessment Criteria

[…]the bees in their area. These are mainly beekeepers who are using the dark European honey bee Apis mellifera mellifera, mainly because they believe that is the type of bee most suited to that area. On their behalf, can I ask you to check if this is the case and work with them? Some of the breeding stock is excellent […]

Genetic Identification and Introgression Analysis

Beekeeping activities, especially queen trading, have shaped the distribution of honey bee (Apis mellifera) subspecies in Europe, and have resulted in extensive introductions of two eastern European C-lineage subspecies (A. m. ligustica and A. m. carnica) into the native range of the M-lineage A. m. mellifera subspecies in Western Europe. As a consequence, replacement and gene flow between native and […]
Read more » Genetic Identification and Introgression Analysis

Lecturers

Beekeeping Lecturers The following list of lecturers and demonstrators is intended to help event organisers plan their programme. All of them support the aims of BIBBA, but BIBBA are unable to verify their knowledge, ability or suitability to your requirements. Please make arrangements directly with the speaker. Roger Patterson Roger Lives in West Sussex and will travel any distance. Tel […]

B4 Project – Cornwall – PL17

The purpose of the B4 Project is to conserve, protect and increase the population of Apis mellifera mellifera, the European Dark Honey Bee (EDHB), by the fusion of science and beekeeping. This will be achieved by: Setting up reserves with like-minded beekeepers. Working closely with scientists to identify genetic purity of samples taken geographically. Informing the public about the EDHB. […]

Genetic Origin & Survival

[…]influence of genetic origin and its interaction with environmental effects on the survival of Apis mellifera L. colonies in […]

Controlled Mating and Hygienic Behaviour

[…]to mate locally, can result in colonies with high levels of hygiene. Full text pdf Keywords Apis mellifera, hygienic behaviour, instrumental insemination, natural mating, […]

Biodiversity and Local Partnerships

[…]since the age of 15 years, flagged up the importance of preserving native honey bee stocks (Apis mellifera mellifera) as these are best adapted to UK climatic conditions, instead of relying on continued importation of foreign subspecies. Unrestricted importation of alien queens and bees carries the associated risk of bringing in new pests and diseases (like Small Hive Beetle) and […]

What is the ‘British Black’ bee?

[…]to the Urals, the native sub-species is commonly known as the Dark European honey bee or Apis mellifera mellifera (The first two latin names denote the genus and the species, and the third name denotes the sub-species). Common names for the Dark European Bee include ‘Old English’, ’British Black Bee’, ‘Irish Black Bee’ and ‘Brown Bee’. see […]

The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

[…]modern specimens of Dark Bees from the UK and Ireland fit into the genetic specification of Apis mellifera mellifera (see e.g. the article by Pritchard). Characterisitics of British A.m.m. Physical characters Cooper, 19865 Bees “black”. Long abdominal overhairs. Characteristic wing type. Genetically large size. Behavioural characters I will now discuss some of the behavioural characteristics of the British A.m.m. as […]
Read more » The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

Mike Saunders “A current attempt to recover Apis mellifera mellifera from mongrelised stocks in the Welsh Borders”

[…]are nearly-enough from a single race, so that they breed true. In Britain, the native race Apis mellifera mellifera (A.m.m), is argued to be the best one to use, but it is hard to find in proven near-pure form except in a few parts of the Celtic fringe. This talk describes an on-going attempt to use selective breeding to move […]
Read more » Mike Saunders “A current attempt to recover Apis mellifera mellifera from mongrelised stocks in the Welsh Borders”

What is Apis mellifera mellifera?

What is Apis mellifera mellifera? Apis mellifera mellifera, Linnaeus 1758 is a subspecies and northern geographical race of Apis mellifera, the western honeybee. It may be subdivided into many local ecotypes. Its various vernacular names include: “Dark European Honeybee” (English), “L’abeille noire” (French), “Die dunkle Biene” (German) and “Det mörka Nordiska Biet” (Swedish). Apis mellifera mellifera is distinguished from other […]

The Native Irish Honey Bee

The Native Irish Honey Bee Apis mellifera mellifera Launched on the 18th September by our close friends and colleagues in Ireland, this book will become a ‘go to’ source of information not just for beekeepers in the island of Ireland but for all beekeepers who keep Amm bees or who want to know more. It covers all the essentials: What […]

NatBIP News No6

[…]through natural selection. This is why BIBBA puts emphasis on the native strain of honey bee, Apis mellifera mellifera. Beekeepers can argue about the relative merits of different strains and sub-species but ultimately, for bee improvement, we need to go down the easiest route. If beekeepers could all agree, we could try to impose an exotic strain on to our […]