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Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]workbox and tie a red flag or marker on the handle in case they are dropped on the ground in the heat of the moment. A round marking cage known as the “crown of thorns” is a very useful piece of equipment also, but this is very easy to lose and again it is better to have a red flag […]

Jutland Visit

[…]hives stacked up ready for the honey flow. After a feast prepared by his mother, we drove over the heather moors where ancient Juniper bushes grew. Our non-beekeeping partners had an interesting trip up the coast visiting the St George museum, this was the flagship of Nelson and were then taken to the home of the guide and after being […]

Laesoe 2004

[…]log hive beekeeping were practised in prehistoric times were in many areas cleared and replaced by heather moors (as on Laeso). Thus log hives were replaced by skeps, and heather/skep management favoured swarmy bees – which were actually imported into Sweden from at least the 15th century. When sugar became cheap and movable-frame hives were adopted, swarminess fell out of […]

John Dew’s Views – the Best Bee

[…]in heather areas that is more inclined to swarm than are bees out of flying distance of the heather. This is a response to the very meagre forage available for most of the year and a sudden abundance for a short period late in the season. The foregoing information provides evidence that the ecotype of the Dark bee which, over […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]of our native honeys.) Even roadside verges are mown and treated with selective herbicide. Where heather moorland has been over-grazed or otherwise neglected, the heather has been replaced by bracken; let us hope there will never be a shortage of wealthy sportsmen to pay for the maintenance of the grouse moors. The latest threat to the variety of British honey […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

Paul Cross “Development of a miniature vibration energy harvester for battery-less tracking of honey bees”

[…]micro-generator that harvests electrical energy from the bee’s body vibrations will power radio-wave transmission from a miniaturized antenna attached to the bees’ thorax. This will eliminate the need for bulky battery-powered transmitters and provide an unlimited energy source over the insect’s lifetime with negligible hindrance to its flight capacity. The transmitted signal will be captured by an automated suite of […]
Read more » Paul Cross “Development of a miniature vibration energy harvester for battery-less tracking of honey bees”

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]have just observed at least ten honey bees as well as one Bombus terrestris queen on a clump of heather. I like to do a spot check to see roughly what percentage are of native appearance. The figure goes up and down a bit according to who has what bees in the area. I will check all my colonies in […]

Queens – an example of collaboration between beekeepers, by Roger Patterson

[…]area the summer was very warm, so I had to put caged queens in the shade, as queens suffer in the heat and the fondant can become quite runny. Queens were sent in plastic puzzle cages with 4 workers, the food compartments filled with commercial fondant. The cages were placed loosely into previously used padded bags and stapled. It was […]
Read more » Queens – an example of collaboration between beekeepers, by Roger Patterson