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August 2022 BIBBA Monthly

[…]I name my colonies after plants, trees, birds, etc. Violet had a 2021 queen that overwintered well and was doing well in early 2022, with the early crop good. On 27th June I noted the queen was failing. On 26th July the queen had disappeared and there were emergency cells, which I reduced to one. On 12th August there were […]

A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing Nuclei

[…]scenarios and depend on such factors as the equipment available, how many queens you want, and the final fate of the raised queensThe method described here aims to simultaneously produce both queens and nuclei and would probably suit a medium-sized beekeeping operation, a few beekeepers working together, or an association’s breeding programme. Basis of the Method In September 2016, […]
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Improving bees by raising your own queens

[…]– a practical course The course consists of one day self-study using bespoke video tutorials and then a practical day in the apiary with Roger Patterson. The improvement of bees is an important part of beekeeping. The suitability of bees to the environment and their temper are issues that concern the caring beekeeper, but are not often taught. The course […]

BOBBI Spring 2022 Newsletter

[…]Something I have never experienced before. Those queens that did make it, then had to battle wind and the rain to try and get mated.  And those that did, once laying, their nucleus colonies failed to build up sufficiently to go into winter. What did we learn?I suspect lack of forage due to poor weather and bad flying days was […]

NatBIP News No8

[…]on the BIBBA website, free for all to use. Some parts of the Guide are still not complete and there is always room for beekeepers to submit useful tips, techniques, and ideas. The 2022 NatBIP Record Card is available for download for your use so that you can continuously assess the qualities of your bees, essential for choosing which queens […]

March 2022 BIBBA Monthly

[…]us to get our message across directly to more beekeepers. We have completely re-vamped the BIBBA Stand and now have electronic sign-up for new memberships and a card payment system. Both were very successful as was the level of sales of our books and other publications. However, the most useful and valuable part of the day was the opportunity to […]

Home

[…]Programme (NatBIP) has been launched in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. This is an initiative organised by the Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders’ Association (BIBBA), with the aims of reducing the number of imports of honey bees into Britain, Ireland and associated islands* and of improving the quality of our honey bees. This […]

Why do the bees rear so many drones?

[…]of us have started three years ago, teaching beginners and others, with a bias toward conservation and the environment, rearing our own queens from black bees. Why do the bees rear so many drones? This piece aims to explain: why the production of a large number of drones is the inevitable consequence of the free mating of queens in […]

Home5

[…]Programme (NatBIP) ihas been launched in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. This is an initiative organised by the Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders’ Association (BIBBA), with the aims of reducing the number of imports of honey bees into Britain, Ireland and associated islands* and of improving the quality of our honey bees. This […]

Home3a

[…]Programme (NatBIP) ihas been launched in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. This is an initiative organised by the Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders’ Association (BIBBA), with the aims of reducing the number of imports of honey bees into Britain, Ireland and associated islands* and of improving the quality of our honey bees. This […]

Sandringham Report 2021

[…]was simply interested in finding one or two local beekeepers who were interested in raising local Amm queens. The reply informed me about BIBBA’s plan to start rearing Amm queens on the Sandringham Estate and since I only lived a couple of miles away would I be interested in getting   a project off the ground! The initial aim was to […]

BIBBA Books

[…]today, we are bombarded with international communications, promotions, soundbites, sensationalism and the like, with the same information, whether reliable or not, appearing in many places. Taking inappropriate advice can mean a dead colony, so we need to occasionally check and challenge what we are told.” Colony Increase: The Roger Patterson Method This book describes a little known but simple way […]

The Native Irish Honey Bee

[…]in Ireland, this book will become a ‘go to’ source of information not just for beekeepers in the island of Ireland but for all beekeepers who keep Amm bees or who want to know more. It covers all the essentials: What is a native Irish honey bee? Consideration of honey bee genetics (which will become an increasingly important issue in […]

Lune Valley New Breeding Apiary

[…]calculated that the total cost would be around £7500. To date we have received £5500 in grants and the balance has been raised through various fund-raising activities such as our Annual Open Day and sales of Lune Valley Long Hives. The views and opinions expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or […]

Bee Improvement Strategies

[…]or group should consider is what method should I/we follow to Improve our bees and to produce queens. There are a few key choices depending on your aims, capacity (time and equipment) and capabilities. I’m assuming the reader is looking for a bee that is native and/or locally adapted. Kevin […]

NatBIP News No 7

[…]up the sub-species. Some people think it is too late to do anything about it, the damage is done, and the only answer is to keep buying in good bees, but we think that is just continuing the vicious circle. Can we make a difference? The theory of bee improvement is one thing, but it is only of value if […]

NatBIP News No6

[…]By performing an artificial swarm, he was able to harvest early swarm cells, manipulate them and the parent colony to provide potential new queens.  This really is the easiest, and least complex method of queen rearing, and perfectly suitable to anyone that wishes to rear a few of their own queen  to replace existing or give away to friends etc. Phil […]

BIBBA Monthly – June 2021

[…]to be the case. To read more about this project, click here. Nosema ceranae, Fipronil and their combination compromise honey bee reproduction via changes in male physiology. This article discusses the effects of Nosema cerannae on the life traits of mature drones, following exposure under semi-field conditions. The results show that the parasite/insecticide combination drastically affect both physiology and survival. […]

Bee Improvement Days 2021

[…]Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders' Association (BIBBA) will be running a small number of practical and theoretical courses during the summer months. These will be aimed at beekeepers who wish to improve their bees, with emphasis on suitability to the environment, docility, calmness on the comb, ease of management, good use of stores, etc. The improvement of bees is an […]

North Devon Bee Improvement Group-EX32

[…]our skills to become self-sufficient in producing Queens and colonies for our teaching programme and as a source of local bees for beginners. In the long term we would be excited to part of the effort to improve the nation’s […]

NatBIP News No5

[…]have spelt disaster on quite a large scale. Fortunately, the fine weather has come just in time and the bees are now, at last, bringing nectar and pollen in. Being able to cope with whatever nature throws at the bees is a very important quality and is the principle behind ‘local adaptation’. Through ‘survival of the fittest’ our bees can […]

NatBIP News No4

[…]opposed to the import of package bees, through the loophole of trade between Northern Ireland and Britain, has just been announced. It seems they have gone back on their assurances, made in February, that only queens, and not packages of bees, can be imported from Europe. As they put it, previously, “HMRC have anti-avoidance measures in place to ensure that […]

Dover and Districts BKA Q rearing support group – CT4

[…]course specifically designed to meet the individual needs of each participant. It covers both theory and husbandry techniques delivered as Zoom meetings. Individual members are guided to choose a queen rearing method appropriate for their circumstances and skill level; individual or small group support will be given as they undertake their queen rearing. There is no charge for this course, […]
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East Midlands 1998

[…]being able to fly due to the weather, but we can take steps to improve the acceptance of grafts and the finishing of cells by supplementary feeding of both syrup and pollen. Changes made this year at the outset of the season were largely successful, and these were:- Use of plastic foundation in the Apidea mini-nucs. This proved to be […]

Recommended YouTube Videos

[…]may need the viewer to take into account regional variations and make adjustments based on their own knowledge and experience. Beginners Pests and Diseases Management techniques Queen rearing and bee improvement General […]

NatBIP News No3

[…]a bee improvement point of view, it is important to start assessing the qualities of our colonies, and therefore of our queens, so that we can select a queen, or queens, to use to produce the next generation of queens. Ideally, have a record card for each colony (i.e. one for each queen) and assess the colony on each inspection. […]

NatBIP News No2

[…]will quickly build up as to which colonies have what you want and which colonies, perhaps, need their queens replacing, or the colony at least removed from the ‘breeding area’. How long before I can select a ‘breeder queen’? Much has been written about queen rearing but surprisingly little about assessment of colonies and selecting which queen to breed from. […]

Salisbury and District BKA

[…]encourage and support local beekeepers keep locally-adapted bees with locally raised, open-mated queens of local heritage.   Please Contact: Matthew […]

BIBBA Opposes the Importation of Honey Bees and Queens

BIBBAOpposes the Importation of Honey Bees and Queens Here are 15 reasons why: Bee Health BIBBA supports the prosperity and wellbeing of all our current populations of bees, including honey bees, bumblebees and solitary bees as well as other pollinators, Imported honey bees pose a considerable risk each year to our present populations in many different ways. This ever-growing practice […]
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NatBIP News No1

The National Bee Improvement Programme The new season is fast approaching and so to allow beekeepers to prepare for participating in NatBIP we have added the NatBIP Record Card and instruction sheet. This will also be available in the NatBIP GUIDE on the BIBBA website. Record Card The card can be printed out on A4 paper, one for each colony. […]

Section 8.1 – Dominating an Area with the Selected Strain

[…]us to see at a glance our progress (see using NatBIP record card). We can then select and cull the queens that we consider don’t display the chosen traits and replace them with ones that do. We then have our colonies headed by queens we have selected. From these we can produce daughter queens through our queen breeding programme….…. this […]
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Section 7.1 – The Mating of Queens

[…]and mini+ nucs Whether you are using natural queen cells, emergency queen cells, grafted queen cells or cells produced from larval transfer kits (such as Jenter or Cupkit), the next step in the process is finding a home for the queen cell or virgin queen so that she can go on mating flights from about the age of 5 days […]

Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

[…]things in beekeeping, the best way to learn is to have a go, find out what works or does not work, and then try to refine or improve the technique over time. Although there is an enormous array of information available on queen rearing, it is appropriate to include a few techniques that beekeepers have found work well for them, […]