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Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

[…]two sections – part one was Simple Bee Improvement in last month’s edition, here is part two and the final part will be in next month’s edition. Starting Stock Once a beekeeper or group has mastered simple bee improvement you may wish to expand your activities and as well as controlling the female lines start to influence the drones they […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

Improving bees by raising your own queens

[…]– a practical course The course consists of one day self-study using bespoke video tutorials and then a practical day in the apiary with Roger Patterson. The improvement of bees is an important part of beekeeping. The suitability of bees to the environment and their temper are issues that concern the caring beekeeper, but are not often taught. The course […]

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]bees, again not easy for everyone. A third and perhaps more ‘natural’ method is simply to let the queens mate as they please, selecting the offspring by culling apparent crossbreeds. The natural beekeeping movement, as discussed by Brian Dennis and by me, is gathering momentum – it is if nothing else, cheap to operate, and arguably can lead to bees […]

Webinars – Summary

Recordings of the majority of webinars are also available on our YouTube Channel Don’t forget to sign up here, for free, to learn more about our future […]

NatBIP News No4

[…]opposed to the import of package bees, through the loophole of trade between Northern Ireland and Britain, has just been announced. It seems they have gone back on their assurances, made in February, that only queens, and not packages of bees, can be imported from Europe. As they put it, previously, “HMRC have anti-avoidance measures in place to ensure that […]

Methods for Rearing and Selection of Queens

[…]testing of colonies. Standardized recommendations for the organization of performance tests and the measurement of the most common selection characters are presented. Statistical methods and data preconditions for the estimation of breeding values which integrate pedigree and performance data from as many colonies as possible are described as the most efficient selection method for large populations. Alternative breeding programmes for […]

Caging Virgin Queens

[…]Queens were reared using standard beekeeping methods (Doolittle/grafting) and emerged from their cells into vials held in an incubator at 34C. All 12 combinations gave high survival (90 or 100%) for three days but only one method (wooden cage, with attendants, honey) gave 100% survival to day seven. Factors affecting queen survival were analysed. Across all combinations, attendant bees significantly […]

Can BIBBA supply me with queens?

[…]patience is advised if native or near native bees are sourced from outside your own area, but even then there are some parts where conditions are vastly different even only 10-15 miles away. We do, however, hope that breeding groups will cooperate together and swap genetic material where approppriate.  Some breeding groups provide queens to neighbouring beekeepers in order to […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

[…]two sections – part one was Simple Bee Improvement in last month’s edition, here is part two and the final part will be in next month’s edition. Starting Stock Once a beekeeper or group has mastered simple bee improvement you may wish to expand your activities and as well as controlling the female lines start to influence the drones they […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]bees, again not easy for everyone. A third and perhaps more ‘natural’ method is simply to let the queens mate as they please, selecting the offspring by culling apparent crossbreeds. The natural beekeeping movement, as discussed by Brian Dennis and by me, is gathering momentum – it is if nothing else, cheap to operate, and arguably can lead to bees […]

Laesoe 2004

Laesoe Conference 2004 BIBBA and SICAMM Combined Laesoe Conference 2004 Ten delegates from Ireland and the UK decided to approach the Danish island of Laeso, venue of the 2004 SICAMM/BIBBA Dark Bee Conference, from Gothenburg in Sweden. The chosen conveyance, Mr. Börjeson’s “sea taxi”, provided an efficient though very choppy passage. Once on the island we joined other BIBBA members […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]by the adult bees. Honey bees belong to the family of social bees which includes bumble bees and the tropical stingless bees of the genus Meliponinae. The social bees nest in colonies headed by a single fertile female, the queen, which is generally the only egg layer in the colony. Foraging for nectar and other tasks such as feeding the […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner