Search Results

Search results for "dark european honeybee"

Results 1 - 50 of 95Page 1 of 2
Sorted by: Relevance | Sort by: DateResults per-page: 10 | 20 | 50 | All

A Native Dark Bee Project

[…]has not been employed. This work shows that it is possible to reintroduce the native European dark honeybee into suitable areas without depletion of limited A.m.m stocks which could help conserve Apis melifera melifera as a distinct race and increase colonies of our native dark honey […]

The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

[…]Bees. Weierbach: Walmar Verlag 1966, 123-4. Cooper, 21-9. Ruttner, F., Milner, E. & Dews, J.E. The Dark European Honey Bee. Codnor: BIBBA 1990, 18-29. Dr. Robert Paxton; reported by Sweet, D., “Variation in susceptibility to bee diseases among European races of honey bees,” Bee Improvement and Conservation 32, 7-8. Philip […]
Read more » The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

Philip Denwood “Towards a History of the Dark Bee in Britain”

[…]and since 2003 has edited Bee Improvement and Conservation. He is also Secretary of SICAMM, the European dark bee association. Lecture Title: “Towards a History of the Dark Bee in Britain” There are two common misconceptions about honey bees and the dark bee Apis mellifera mellifera in particular in the British isles: 1) English Government circles (as distinct from Scottish) […]
Read more » Philip Denwood “Towards a History of the Dark Bee in Britain”

History

[…]of the members. Beowulf Cooper recognised that the native bee, Apis mellifera mellifera (the Dark European Honeybee) was very much alive and kicking in spite of Brother Adam and others pronouncement of its demise as long ago as 1920. Beo, as he was known to his friends, was an entomologist employed by the Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food. He […]

Links

[…]Conservatione Apis melliferae melliferae International Society for the Conservation of the Dark European Honeybee BBKA – British Beekeepers Association BBKA has a wide variety of benefits for members. It has a Spring Convention, an examination system and a monthly magazine “BBKA News”. BIBBA is a Specialist Member of BBKA. CABK – Central Association of Beekeepers For those with an interest […]

Laesoe 2004

[…]presented in 2000 and 2002. It was heartening to see the continuing widely-based support for the Dark European Bee, and especially the cooperation between beekeepers, amateur and commercial, and scientists. The papers will be published in due course. After Mr. Börjeson’s prognostications on the weather, for the return trip the Irish delegates decided to fly direct to Copenhagen by light […]

John Dew’s Views – the Best Bee

[…]consideration for our purpose.[/column-half-1] [column-half-2]These are the native British or Dark European, the Italian, the Carniolan and the Caucasian. Current scientific opinion (see Ruttner, 1988) is that the Western honeybee probably originated and developed as a successful species (Apis mellifera) in the central part of North Africa. It then spread from this area in three directions: southward, to colonise Africa […]

What is Apis mellifera mellifera?

[…]honeybee. It may be subdivided into many local ecotypes. Its various vernacular names include: “Dark European Honeybee” (English), “L’abeille noire” (French), “Die dunkle Biene” (German) and “Det mörka Nordiska Biet” (Swedish). Apis mellifera mellifera is distinguished from other subspecies of the honey bee by a) Morphological characters, including colour, size, wing venation, abdominal hair length; b) Genetic characters identifiable by […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]that a colony cannot readily adapt itself when transferred to a different kind of environment. The Dark European Honey bee, Apis mellifera mellifera, is fairly uniform over its whole range, having had but a comparatively short time in which regional varieties could evolve, but even in this race differences can be observed between strains. In France, where the bee has […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

Galtee Bee Breeding Group

[…]of Ireland. With our cool, damp, oceanic climate we believe that the native Irish strains of Dark European Bee are by far the most suitable for our climate. Unfortunately no effort was made to improve our bees until the formation of GBBG in 1991. Even in that comparatively short time our simple breeding policy has resulted in improvements beyond our […]

What is the ‘British Black’ bee?

[…]the genus and the species, and the third name denotes the sub-species). Common names for the Dark European Bee include ‘Old English’, ’British Black Bee’, ‘Irish Black Bee’ and ‘Brown Bee’. see […]
Read more » Conserving biodiversity in the dark European honeybee

The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

[…]Bees. Weierbach: Walmar Verlag 1966, 123-4. Cooper, 21-9. Ruttner, F., Milner, E. & Dews, J.E. The Dark European Honey Bee. Codnor: BIBBA 1990, 18-29. Dr. Robert Paxton; reported by Sweet, D., “Variation in susceptibility to bee diseases among European races of honey bees,” Bee Improvement and Conservation 32, 7-8. Philip […]
Read more » The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

Philip Denwood “Towards a History of the Dark Bee in Britain”

[…]and since 2003 has edited Bee Improvement and Conservation. He is also Secretary of SICAMM, the European dark bee association. Lecture Title: “Towards a History of the Dark Bee in Britain” There are two common misconceptions about honey bees and the dark bee Apis mellifera mellifera in particular in the British isles: 1) English Government circles (as distinct from Scottish) […]
Read more » Philip Denwood “Towards a History of the Dark Bee in Britain”

A Native Dark Bee Project

[…]has not been employed. This work shows that it is possible to reintroduce the native European dark honeybee into suitable areas without depletion of limited A.m.m stocks which could help conserve Apis melifera melifera as a distinct race and increase colonies of our native dark honey […]

Conserving black bees

[…]Conser­vation” Apidologie 40: 193-416 M Alice Pinto et al. 2014 Genetic Integ­rity of the Dark European honeybee (Apis mellifer mellifera) from protected popula­tions. Journal of Apicultural Research 53(2): 269-278 Seeley T. D. et al. A survivor population of wild colonies of European honeybees in the northeastern United States: inves­tigating its genetic structure Apidologie 46 654-666 (2015) Adam, Brother (1983) In […]

I Want Bees

[…]honeybee. It may be subdivided into many local ecotypes. Its various vernacular names include:“Dark European Honeybee” (English),“L’abeille noire” (French),“Die dunkle Biene” (German) and“Det mörka Nordiska Biet” (Swedish) Apis mellifera mellifera is distinguished from other subspecies of the honey bee by:a) Morphological characters, including colour, size, wing venation, abdominal hair length;b) Genetic characters identifiable by DNA analysis;c) Behavioural characters, including colony […]

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]Jo Widdicombe ‘The Honeybees of the British Isles’ by Beowulf A Cooper ‘The Dark European Honeybee’ by F Ruttner, E Milner and J E Dews ‘Breeding Techniques and Selection for Breeding of the Honeybee’ by F Ruttner, A & E Milner ‘Queen Raising: The Jenkins Way’ by G Jenkins ‘Pedigree Bee Breeding in Western Europe’ a BIBBA Publication Full details […]

Some history of the East Midlands group

[…]mono-strained with his gentle black Galtee bees. These are Apis mellifera mellifera bees, the Dark European honeybee. With our first two seasons at this new site now over, we can look back on the efforts and the results with some satisfaction. Over a hundred queens raised the first year and 70 the second year, and successfully mated and distributed. Most […]

Galtee Bee Breeding Group

[…]of Ireland. With our cool, damp, oceanic climate we believe that the native Irish strains of Dark European Bee are by far the most suitable for our climate. Unfortunately no effort was made to improve our bees until the formation of GBBG in 1991. Even in that comparatively short time our simple breeding policy has resulted in improvements beyond our […]

What is Apis mellifera mellifera?

[…]honeybee. It may be subdivided into many local ecotypes. Its various vernacular names include: “Dark European Honeybee” (English), “L’abeille noire” (French), “Die dunkle Biene” (German) and “Det mörka Nordiska Biet” (Swedish). Apis mellifera mellifera is distinguished from other subspecies of the honey bee by a) Morphological characters, including colour, size, wing venation, abdominal hair length; b) Genetic characters identifiable by […]