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Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]in the case of the cavity-nesting species, their ability to cool the nest by evaporation of water collected outside. These attributes enable the colonies to achieve a marked degree of temperature regulation within the nest irrespective of the external temperature. The genus Apis was thus enabled to colonise a wide variety of environments, ranging from tropical to cool temperate. The […]
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Webinars – Summary

Recordings of the majority of webinars are also available on our YouTube Channel Don’t forget to sign up here, for free, to learn more about our future […]

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]shop. They are washable and even hard flakes of propolis can be removed from them with cold water. If one has handled a stock which has suspect brood comb, the gloves can be burned without regret and a new pair brought into use. Bees seem to have difficulty in piercing the rubber gloves with their stings and when they do […]

Jutland Visit

[…]to liquefy before it is blended. The honey is then pumped into huge double skinned vats where iced water is circulated to reduce the temperature and where the honey is either blended or selected honeys are retained. The honey is filtered at every stage and is then pumped to six separate automated bottling stations. Creamed honey is bottled at 4 […]

Native Honey Bees

[…]Urals, where they evolved in isolation, having been cut off by such natural barriers as mountains, water and ice. With many of the “pure” stocks of all sub species worldwide there has been a certain amount of introgression, due to bees being introduced into parts where they are not native and “tweaking” by breeders. This applies to Amm too, but […]

What is Apis mellifera mellifera?

[…]DNA analysis; c) Behavioural characters, including colony size and development, longevity, pollen collection.     The indigenous range of Apis mellifera mellifera stretches from the Atlantic seaboard of Norway, Britain, Ireland and France eastward across Western, Northern and Central Europe north of the Alps and Carpathians to the Urals and beyond.   The natural range of A.m.m. coincides with the […]

Downloads Old

[…]take the data generated by DrawWing and quickly display the results. BIBBA  file collection   Download  There is a collection of useful Morphometric software that is as a zipped folder of several files that can be downloaded in one operation. Many of these have been created by Albert Knight on behalf of BIBBA. For technical reasons, that are due to Internet servers, […]

A Native Dark Bee Project

[…]to graft the smallest larvae into frames holding plastic cups each containing a tiny droplet of water. This was done either in the apiary or car. Frames of grafts were labelled and transferred into reception nuclei of queenless bees which were fed pollen substitute and syrup. Six queens were produced to point of lay and became the next years drone […]

Lecturers

[…]your Lecturer well by meeting them and making sure they are comfortable. They may need a glass of water. Make sure there is a good Chairman who is lively, doesn’t make a lengthy introduction and is able to shield the speaker from questions that may be asked to embarrass the Lecturer, or to make a point about something that has […]

The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

[…]to acarine D: Cooper 1986.9 a) Flight pattern characters. Low temperature flight. Non-collection of dew at dawn. Reluctance to fly when snow lying. b) Colony population characters. Longevity. Non-prolificacy. c) Characters adaptive to season and locality. Heavy spring to summer pollen storage. Heavy late summer pollen storage. Early cessation of brood rearing in late summer. Thriftiness. Adaptation to local flora. […]
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Abberton Native Bee Group/ Essex 4 Bees – CO2

[…]is managed by the local Wildlife trusts, in this case Essex Wildlife Trust. Essex and Suffolk Water had recently increased the water level of the reservoir by 5 meters submerging part of the land and they were looking for ways to offset this which is where BIBBA came in. The reintroduction of the native bee was attractive to them and […]
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BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]be the centre of the universe when it comes to beekeeping, but that does not mean that it is a backwater where there is no change. In fact there have been some very forward thinking and well known beekeepers here. Up until the late 1800s skeps were the usual hive for bees on the island as well as across (“across” […]

Downloads

[…]data generated by DrawWing and quickly display the results. http://www.drawwing.org/ BIBBA file collection There is a collection of useful Morphometric software that is as a zipped folder of several files that can be downloaded in one operation. Many of these have been created by Albert Knight on behalf of BIBBA. For technical reasons, that are due to Internet servers, the original […]

I Want Bees

[…]DNA analysis;c) Behavioural characters, including colony size and development, longevity, pollen collection. The natural range of A.m.m. coincides with the 15-20° zone. (Copyright […]

Conserving black bees

[…]in many ways for remote living on an island with only three ferries per week and no public water supply or electricity. However, Colon­say’s very resourceful Gaelic commu­nity of around 120 kindly shepherded myself and family around many of life’s pitfalls. Keep away from the “ex­pensive college” was always sound advice, quietly given! With this in mind before starting my […]

Queens: Collaboration and how to make it easy on yourself and your bees – by Karl Colyer

[…]point where they couldn’t seem to sort themselves or other bees out. I sprayed some with warm water and this appeared to help.– with the reduced fondant remaining, the receiving bees got into the cage in double quick time and two cages had the dead queens inside. I’m unsure if it was the sticky fondant or the rapid introduction. Small […]
Read more » Queens: Collaboration and how to make it easy on yourself and your bees – by Karl Colyer

Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

[…]cutting out of combs with a craft knife. These cells could be placed in an incubator, with water for humidity, at 34.5°C. or transferred, one each to nucs, mininucs or mini+nucs. Queen Rearing Method without grafting (or finding the queen) This queen rearing method does not require the queen to be found or larvae to be grafted. If the bees […]

East Midlands 1998

[…]it very easy to pick up the tiniest larva. The plastic cups are primed with two drops of warm water using an insulin syringe, these are available at chemists for £2 for a pack of 10. The tiny larvae float off the grafting tool like magic, thus avoiding damage. Again we are indebted to Dr. Francis Ratnieks for showing us […]

NatBIP News No6

[…]we had the right bees for the job. After shaking them in to the bowl we lightly sprayed them with water to prevent the bees from flying away. After careful scooping, the bees they were put into the Apideas and quickly closed up. We kept the Aideas in our bee shed for 3 days in a dark corner and made […]

Why do the bees rear so many drones?

[…]it can hardly even feed itself); it cannot defend the colony; secrete wax and build comb; bring in water and fan for cooling; clean the cells or pull out infected larvae… the list of a drone’s incompetencies is long - so why do the bees produce them in such enormous numbers? Some professionals regard the drones as largely useless and […]