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Section 4.14 – NatBIP 1 Record Card Instructions

[…]of standard. *To assess this score, the strength going into winter may need to be assessed. A nuc will probably be weaker in spring than full-size colony. Main Table Some columns can be assessed at each inspection, but others need only be used when appropriate. 2021: Date of inspection Insp. by: Inspected by – useful if working in a group […]
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Section 2.1 – How NatBIP will work

Participation The Programme needs to be relevant to beekeepers’ needs and be able to achieve positive results for beekeepers in all circumstances. Bearing in mind the different conditions beekeepers are working in, different skill levels and experience, as well as variations in types of bee across the regions, finding common ground, may appear difficult. Rather than lay down rules of […]

Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

[…]could be placed in an incubator, with water for humidity, at 34.5°C. or transferred, one each to nucs, mininucs or mini+nucs. Queen Rearing Method without grafting (or finding the queen) This queen rearing method does not require the queen to be found or larvae to be grafted. If the bees do not raise any queen cells nothing is lost, the […]

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]with the proviso that drones are present in the apiary. Find the queen and transfer her to a nucleus hive with a comb of sealed brood flanked by two frames of food & pollen [and the adhering bees]. If the nuc is to remain in the apiary, shake in bees from two more combs. Close up the combs in the […]

News for Non-Members – June 2020

[…]research see what you can do with a nuc box learn about some BIBBA webinars the full article on nucs is available to BIBBA members at […]

Sandringham Report 2021

[…]up a supply of colonies to back up the queen cell rearing. Bees are essential for making up mating nucs, whether they be mini-nucs only requiring a cup-full of bees or a 2-frame nuc requiring a frame of stores, a frame of bees and largely sealed brood and three frames of empty comb for the queen to lay up once […]

Section 1.1- Introduction

Introduction The National Bee Improvement Programme is available for all beekeepers, from the geographical area of England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands, to participate in. The Programme is designed to promote the improvement of local bees and the development of local ecotypes and to avoid further input from imported bees. It is recognised that […]

Section 1.2 – Aims, Imports & Bee Breeding

The Aims The aims of the Programme are to improve the quality of our honey bees and to provide an alternative to the importation of exotic sub-species, throughout the participating areas. It is believed that, through the selection of local and native honey bees, a hardy, docile and productive bee can result. This aim will be achieved by sustainable methods […]

Section 1.3 – Participation

Participation For the National Bee Improvement Programme (NatBIP) to successfully fulfil its aims, we are seeking the support and participation of as many beekeepers as possible. Maximum support for the programme will result in a reduction in the demand for imported stock, as participants avoid the use of imported bees. This will allow easier progress in improving the quality of […]

Section 1.4 – The Agreement

The Members’ and Supporters’ Agreement Participants in NatBIP will aim to avoid the use of imported bees, or the offspring of recently imported bees. The focus will be on: native bees near-native bees long-established local bees in an area This will allow any beekeeper, whatever their circumstances, to avoid the use of imported stock and take part in improving the […]

Section 7.1 – The Mating of Queens

The Mating of Queens - Use of nucs, mini-nucs and mini+ nucs Whether you are using natural queen cells, emergency queen cells, grafted queen cells or cells produced from larval transfer kits (such as Jenter or Cupkit), the next step in the process is finding a home for the queen cell or virgin queen so that she can go on […]

Section 8.1 – Dominating an Area with the Selected Strain

As we progress through the NatBIP programme to improve our bee stocks it pays to give some thought to how we are going to consolidate any improvements we may have gained through our efforts to establish our selected strain. We have been monitoring our colonies and keeping accurate records to enable us to see at a glance our progress (see […]
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Constitution-2008

[…]shall cease to hold office if he: 18.1 is disqualified from acting as a Trustee by virtue of Section 72 of the Charities Act 1993 or any statutory re-enactment or modification of that provision; 18.2 becomes incapable by reason of mental disorder, illness or injury of managing and administering his own affairs; 18.3 is absent from 3 consecutive Central Association […]

John Harding Queen Rearing

[…]too heavy Why use two 150mm lengths of 50mm pipe? It allows plenty of air movement around all nuclei The distance between the centre base nucleus and the two towers is enough to be detached from the main body of the nest so the bees assume the queen is failing, creating a supersedure effect therefore they are happy to raise […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]mellifera The “A mellifera” (1758) or “A. mellifica” (1761) of Linnaeus is but one small section of the Dark European Honey Bee whose natural territory included the island of Corsica and ranged from the Pyrenees over Europe north of the Alps to the Ural Mountains in the East and included Great Britain and Ireland and southern Sweden. Although there is […]
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Methods for Rearing and Selection of Queens

[…]Recommendations for the handling and quality control of queens complete the queen rearing section. The improvement of colony traits usually depends on a comparative testing of colonies. Standardized recommendations for the organization of performance tests and the measurement of the most common selection characters are presented. Statistical methods and data preconditions for the estimation of breeding values which integrate pedigree […]

Lecturers

[…]where there are usually a large number of colonies for instruction as well as a queen rearing section. He has been a demonstrator since the early 1970s and believes beekeeping should be fun. For business reasons Roger had a break of about 15 years without bees of his own, but kept involved with his local BKA. On his return to active […]

Jim Ryan “Beekeeping – If the bees wrote the book”

As a child I used to help my grandfather making up section crates and wiring and waxing frames. I started my real career as a beekeeper in 1983 and since then I qualified as a lecturer in 1989. I edited An Beachaire the Irish Beekeeper for 14 years retiring in 2012. I lecture at Gormanston Summer Course regularly and have […]
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Some history of the East Midlands group

[…]crossbar on which the mini-nuc rests. A thick band of rubber cut from a car inner tube straps the nuc to the stake. The mini-nucs are sited so as to give the bees something to help them orient on to the site, such as a bush or small tree. This reduces losses due to queens returning to the wrong nuc. […]

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

[…]but queen cells may be duds. There are methods of minimising the downsides of both. 6) What mating nuc will you use? Three frame nuc needs more resources in terms of bees but is more successful. Mini nucs require fewer bees but are less successful and need more attention. 7) What method will you use to introduce your queens into […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

BIM 33 – Winter 2010

[…]Clare A model agreement – Terry Clare Queen rearing group – Roger Patterson Warnholz Mini BiVo nuc – Dave Cushman The Harding Mini Nuc – John Harding Bee improvement – Roger Patterson Entombment follow-up – Dave Cushman BBKA Forum – Roger Patterson Morphometry Course – Dinah Sweet BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

Black Bee Reserve

Black Bee Reserve England’s First Black Bee Reserve at Mount Edgcumbe Country Park On a glorious sunny day in one of our most beautiful country parks in the grounds of Mount Edgcumbe House, Cornwall, a crowd gathered to celebrate the opening of England’s first Black Bee Reserve.The spacious public viewing room allows close observation of the bees in the apiary, […]

Bees for Sale

[…]imported queens. We presently do not have the ability to inspect or vouch for such queens and nucs and simply require the seller to give an assurance that they are raised from local stock and are not imports, and that the seller supports the objectives of BIBBA. Learn to Create Your Own: NatBIP Guide Roger’s “Free Bees and Queens for […]

Sustainability – Bees and Queens for Everyone using low-cost, simple methods

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities.  Benefits of teaching apiaries. Producing bees and queens in teaching apiaries.  Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop.  Including queen […]
Read more » Sustainability – Bees and Queens for Everyone using low-cost, simple methods

Sustainable Bees & Queens

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens : Midlands

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens : East Anglia

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens – South West

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens – South East

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

NatBIP News No2

[…]qualities of the bees. If not, by all means design your own system, or look at what is offered in Section 4.1 of the NatBIP GUIDE at bibba.com. This can be used as it is, or modified, according to what you or your Group have decided are the desirable qualities that you want in your bees. The important thing is […]

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

[…]season (not much honey though)! The best method for splitting is to find the queen and make up a nuc with her (Frame of brood, shake 2 frames of bees in if staying in same apiary, frame of food and make up with spare empty comb or foundation, feed next day.) The bees in the now queenless colony will create […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

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HAVE YOUR SAY At the end of each BM, we will include this section. We welcome feedback of all kinds and will endeavour to act on each response if we can. Obviously, some people want things that are the opposite of others (have you ever heard about this dilemma in beekeeping?) but all feedback is welcome.If you want to contribute […]