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John Harding Queen Rearing

[…]a beekeeper rather than a keeper of bees. Everybody has their own system of beekeeping and queen rearing that suits them, often without much thought for what’s best for the honeybee, or the possibility of causing unnecessary stress to the colony. The main purpose of any system I produce is its versatility and to have an additional use so you […]

Steve Rose Queen Rearing

[…]so that the queen pheromones have normal access to the box again. Download pdf of full article:Queen Rearing Method – Steve Rose July […]

Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

[…]name La Reine (French for Queen), queens, nucs and provide pollination services. Lecture Title: “Queen Rearing Simplified” Queen rearing simplified is about rearing the best quality queens and is useful for small and medium sized apiaries. The method is based on standard equipment and standard frames, so no need for small mating hives, mini frames and specialized equipment. Therefore it’s […]
Read more » Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

Photo by Roger Patterson Queen Rearing Methods There are so many techniques of queen rearing, and so much has been written about them, that it may seem unwise to add any more. Studying too many methods can be a source of much confusion and leave one overwhelmed and unsure of how to proceed. Like most things in beekeeping, the best […]

Queen Rearing Timetable

[…]file was written by Angus Stokes and Albert Knight and provides an interactive way to prepare timetables for using the Jenter or Cupkit Cellplug Box. With a bit of tweaking it can be used for other methods of cell raising. Download Excel spreadsheet of Tom’s Table: […]

Methods for Rearing and Selection of Queens

[…]and practical beekeeping purposes. The basic conditions and different management techniques for queen rearing are described, including recommendations for suitable technical equipment. As the success of breeding programmes strongly depends on the selective mating of queens, a subchapter is dedicated to the management and quality control of mating stations. Recommendations for the handling and quality control of queens complete the […]

Dover and Districts BKA Q rearing support group – CT4

[…]and husbandry techniques delivered as Zoom meetings. Individual members are guided to choose a queen rearing method appropriate for their circumstances and skill level; individual or small group support will be given as they undertake their queen rearing. There is no charge for this course, but participants must be a member of Dover & District BKA and, if excess queens […]
Read more » Dover and Districts BKA Q rearing support group – CT4

Bee Breeding and Queen Rearing Courses UK

[…]Events There are three types of BIBBA event to help and encourage beekeepers to raise their own queens from locally adapted colonies, rather than to use imported queens that may not suit their environment, or run the risk of importing pests and diseases. BIBBA Open Days Bee Improvement For All (BIFA) days One and two day Bee Improvement Courses If […]

Surrey Hills Queen Rearing – GU1

[…]with BIBBA’s objectives we look towards breeding from local stock without importing any bees or queens. Promoting this approach we hope to encourage other beekers to do the same. contact Sarah Rowlands […]

Downloads Old

[…]files are used by individual beekeepers and groups to help them with their bee improvement and queen rearing activities. BIBBA gives permission to freely copy any or all of these files for personal use and also pass the files to others interested in breeding honey bees. BIBBA only asks in return that the source of these files be acknowledged.  DrawWing By […]

Downloads

[…]files are used by individual beekeepers and groups to help them with their bee improvement and queen rearing activities.BIBBA gives permission to freely copy any or all of these files for personal use and also pass the files to others interested in breeding honey bees. BIBBA only asks in return that the source of these files be acknowledged.  DrawWing By Adam […]

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]49 – Spr ing 2017 of the group, including the owner of the selected queen, can still continue queen rearing by their usual methods. How to find like thinking members? I have twenty beekeeping neighbours within two kilometres of my bees, their addresses are published in the CBKA annual report and balance sheet each year. I legged it around all […]

Abberton Native Bee Group/ Essex 4 Bees – CO2

[…]next few years and in addition to raising new queens also focus on teaching bee improvement and queen rearing. It is as important to have good tempered, healthy bees as much as native appearance. Essex Wildlife Trust is a major landowner in Essex with 69 sites over 8,400 acres and there is a willingness to allow us access to these. […]
Read more » Abberton Native Bee Group/ Essex 4 Bees – CO2

East Midlands 1998

[…]Over the years we have kept a record of the many tips that we have found to be of help in queen rearing. Recently these were listed and found to number 55. Use of an incubator for hatching queen cells. This year we had more queen cells that failed to hatch than in previous years. As we take our nucs […]

A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing Nuclei

[…]Beachaire (The Irish Beekeeper) The reader may groan and sigh, “not another queen-rearing method,” and I agree that there seems to be an endless number of ways of rearing queens, including the Miller, Hopkins, Alley, Harden and Harding methods.  Although sometimes seen as a black art, queen-rearing is an important part of beekeeping, and every beekeeper should have access to […]
Read more » A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing Nuclei

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]and look carefully to ensure that one of her legs is not being cut off as well. If this occurs the queen will be superseded. The queen uses her forelegs as a caliper to measure the diameter of each cell before she lays in it. This determines whether a fertile female egg or an unfertilised male egg is laid, depending […]

Margaret Murdin “Bee Genetics Explained” – “Understanding the Queen

[…]They know she is important, but how much do they actually know about her? In simple terms the queen is the mother of  the colony, but there is much more to it than that. Although the egg of a queen and worker are identical, they become very different creatures depending on their diet in the larval stage, that only lasts […]
Read more » Margaret Murdin “Bee Genetics Explained” – “Understanding the Queen

Huw Evans “Electronic monitoring as a tool for better beekeeping and queen breeding”

[…]humidity, hive weight and apiary weather conditions. The data collected offers a beekeeper/queen breeder a powerful tool to examine the colony and queen conditions without disturbing the bees. Weight data can be used to calculate the “adjusted production figure” (average harvested by each apiary minus the harvest of each hive) for each individual hive in order to avoid mistakes in […]
Read more » Huw Evans “Electronic monitoring as a tool for better beekeeping and queen breeding”

2 Day Bee Improvement: Preston

[…]some of the myths Delegates will leave the course with the confidence and skills to start rearing queens and developing their own bee stocks. Who is it for? This course is aimed at beekeepers who:- currently manage several colonies know the “basics” of beekeeping, i.e. the life cycles, swarming procedure of a colony, disease recognition, etc, are able to recognise […]

2 Day Bee Improvement: Preston

[…]some of the myths Delegates will leave the course with the confidence and skills to start rearing queens and developing their own bee stocks. Who is it for? This course is aimed at beekeepers who:- currently manage several colonies know the “basics” of beekeeping, i.e. the life cycles, swarming procedure of a colony, disease recognition, etc, are able to recognise […]

BIBBA Conference 2018

[…]their bees and those locally. There will be information to help beekeepers to produce their own queens from stock that suits their environment, rather than relying on buying queens, possibly imported, that may not. Other beekeeping topics to suit everyone, whatever their experience or interest. We hope to help beekeepers to understand their bees better, so they can develop management […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens : East Anglia

[…]perceived problems in producing queens in the U.K. Overwintering bees and queens. Demystifying queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens : Midlands

[…]perceived problems in producing queens in the U.K. Overwintering bees and queens. Demystifying queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens – South West

[…]perceived problems in producing queens in the U.K. Overwintering bees and queens. Demystifying queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens – South East

[…]perceived problems in producing queens in the U.K. Overwintering bees and queens. Demystifying queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing […]

Bee Improvement and Bee Breeding Groups

[…]local group can pool expertise of different disciplines… honey bee management, record keeping, queen rearing, equipment making, administration, etc. More beekeepers means there are more colonies to select material from and to provide good quality drones, as well as maximising the number of colonies under management, evaluation and study.Groups can liaise with one another and with scientific institutions if they wish. […]

Lecturers

[…]  About Micheál C. Mac Giolla Coda Beekeeping for 50 years. Queen rearing for 20 years. FIBKA certified lecturer for 20 years. Honey Judge for 20 years. Holder of National Diploma in Science (Apiculture). Founder member of Galtee Bee Breeding Group. Past President of BIBBA and FIBKA. Preferred choice of subject: Conservation and Improvement of native bees including all […]

Membership Application

[…]and methods. Demonstrations and workshops on practical subjects, such as colony assessment and queen rearing. Publications and guidance on all aspects of bee improvement and queen rearing. Support projects in areas with a high level of native bees. Courses on bee improvement and raising queens, using both natural methods the bees present us with that will suit the ordinary beekeeper, […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]days which, for a period, is able to lay predominantly diploid worker eggs. From these eggs true queens capable of being mated can be raised, re-establishing queenrightness in the colony. The present situation Apiculture has been practiced in Europe and Asia throughout recorded history. For most of the time the honey bees kept in any country would be indigenous to […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

BIM 26 – Winter 2006

[…]scale, Part 1 – Dr.Dorian Pritchard SICAMM Conference 2006 – Philip Denwood York and District Queen Rearing Programme 2006 – Tom Robinson Obituary: Alan Bernard Hinchley – David Allen Bee Improvement Magazine: subject index. Issues 1-25 – Philip Denwood BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

BIM27 – Spring 2007

[…]BKA Bee Improvement Group – Peter Edwards Project Discover – Mervyn Eddie Techniques for Queen rearing & Introduction – Albert Knight BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

BIM 28 – Autumn 2007

[…]Bee – Brian Milward Inbreeding in the Honeybee – Dorian Pritchard Galtee Bee Breeders’ Group Queen Rearing Workshop – Claire Chavasse Obituary: Claire Chavasse – Micheál Mac Giolla Coda Gormanston and BIBBA – Terry Clare BIBBA General Meeting, Gormanston – John Hendrie The Gormanston Summer Course – Sandra Unwin What is BIBBA For? – Brian Dennis Reflections – Terry Clare […]

BIM 29 – Summer 2008

[…]Dorian Pritchard Impressions of Russia Jo Widdicombe The Queen Rearing Day, Isle of Wight Ian King Queen rearing at Alnwick Brian Ripley Setting up the Ulster Bee Improvement Group (UBIG) Mervyn Eddie DEFRA Consultation Terry Clare Update on Stratford-upon-Avon Bee Improvement Group Peter Edwards Morphometry made easy — eventually! Peter Edwards Varroa destructor and winter losses Terry Clare Nature Reserves […]

BIM 30 – Winter 2008

[…]day. Wally Thrale Bee improvement and conservation in Southern England. Terry Clare Galtee Group queen rearing workshop. Jim Ryan Bee improvement and conservation in County Louth. Medway and North Kent Bee Breeding Group (MedBees). Terry […]

BIM 33 – Winter 2010

[…]BIBBA record card – Philip Denwood Groups – Terry Clare A model agreement – Terry Clare Queen rearing group – Roger Patterson Warnholz Mini BiVo nuc – Dave Cushman The Harding Mini Nuc – John Harding Bee improvement – Roger Patterson Entombment follow-up – Dave Cushman BBKA Forum – Roger Patterson Morphometry Course – Dinah Sweet BIBBA members can download […]

BIM 34 – Spring 2010

[…]David Allen Beekeeping notes – Willie Robson Small scale queen rearing – John Dews Expansion & queen rearing – Chris Broad Queen rearing on a small scale – Tom Robinson JZBZ frame bar – Roger Patterson Inbreeding – Tom Robinson Pesticides and colony losses – Eric Mussen Isle of Man workshop – Doris Fischler A note on MorphPlot – Peter […]

BIM 35 – Winter 2010-11

[…]Roger Patterson Inbreeding part 1 – Dorian Pritchard Thoughts on Morphology – Roger Patterson Queen rearing for one – Albert Knight Conference law – Dorian Pritchard Trustees Report 2010 – Dinah Sweet Financial Statements – 2010 BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

BIM 36 – Summer 2011

[…]Hazelhurst The way forward – Will Messenger Inbreeding part 2 – Dorian Pritchard Simple Queen Rearing – Dinah Sweet The Native Bee – Pam Hunter Dave Cushman – Roger Patterson John Dews Obituary – various Book Review – Philip Denwood The Rose Hive Method: Challenging Conventional Beekeeping, by Tim Rowe. BIBBA Trustees BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of […]