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A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing Nuclei

[…]involve transferring larvae into artificial queen cups, including the punched-cell technique, the Miller method, and the procedure described by Martin O’Rourke in the March 2017 An Beachaire.   Division of Cell-Raising Colony and Distribution of Queen cells Around 3-7 days after grafting, check the cell bar to see how many queen cells have been raised (Figure 6). When the queen […]
Read more » A Simple Method of Simultaneously Raising Queens and Producing Nuclei

Colony Increase – The Roger Patterson Method

[…]are several techniques that can be used on their own if needed. The author has used the whole method or parts successfully for over 40 years. Although it has been used in the UK, there is no reason why it can’t be successfully implemented throughout the world. It is suitable for all beekeepers, whether small scale where selective parts of […]
Read more » Colony Increase – The Roger Patterson Method

Leek and Moorlands – ST9

[…]for over 30 years and welcome beekeepers of all levels of experience. Plans In 2018 we used the Miller method for cell raising, and grafed larvae and also used the Jenter  system..  We used Apidea mini-nucs for mating.  We also trained 4 members in instrumental insemination. Further Info You can see full details and register for information on our meetup […]

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

[…]AMM and Carniolan queens though). Propagating queens You can start to introduce more propagation methods too – different methods of transferring larvae, different set ups of starting queen cells and different mating hives. The Key choices are: 1) What queens will you propagate from – Selection Criteria? 2) What method of transferring larvae will you use, Grafting, Nicot, Cell Punch, […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

2 Day Bee Improvement: Preston

[…]build. Producing “Artificial” queen cell using grafting, cell punching, cell plugs and the Miller method Clipping and marking queens Changing queens in colonies and queen introduction techniques. Drone production Making up queen mating colonies and nuclei. Getting queens mated and mating control. Equipment required – buying, making, improvising or modifying. Dispelling some of the myths Delegates will leave the course […]

2 Day Bee Improvement: Preston

[…]build. Producing “Artificial” queen cell using grafting, cell punching, cell plugs and the Miller method Clipping and marking queens Changing queens in colonies and queen introduction techniques. Drone production Making up queen mating colonies and nuclei. Getting queens mated and mating control. Equipment required – buying, making, improvising or modifying. Dispelling some of the myths Delegates will leave the course […]

BBOBI Group – April 2020 Newsletter

[…]You could also read up on the Miller Method, this is a good link: http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/millermethod.html Keep an eye on the What’sApp group, it is the best way to make cries for help. If you’re not included, email me your phone number to be added to the thirty or so members on the group today. If you do not wish to read […]

NatBIP News No6

[…]methods which allow the bees to choose which eggs or larvae to rear queens from such as the Miller Method or a method where a brood frame with eggs is laid horizontally over a queenless colony, sometimes known as the Hopkins Method. Some beekeepers deliberately use these methods to allow the bees to select their own eggs or larvae. The […]

August 2022 BIBBA Monthly

[…]to replace. The latter part of the day covered four approaches to raising queens; The Miller method, Punched Cell method, larval transfer (grafting) and using Cupkit (or similar) equipment. Your approach, if you choose to raise queens, will help you to save money, improve your bees and experience the satisfaction of queen rearing for yourself. One host grafted for the […]

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]small makes it still more difficult. Look in concentric circles It is a good idea to have a set method of scrutinising each frame as it is lifted out of the brood box. It is always safer to hold the frame directly over the broadest in case the queen might drop off onto the ground and get lost. Holding the […]

Jutland Visit

[…]for gentleness, quietness on the comb and he also tests for hygienic behaviour by the freeze brood method. He says he will raise 30 sister queens but after selection only retains about 5. He discounts any with chalkbrood. Or any with signs of nosema He starts grafting on 20 May and grafts every day until 20 July aiming to produce […]

John Harding Queen Rearing

[…]small or large beekeeping operations Queen cells can be staggered by date for a more manageable method Any method of cell raising can be used It’s easy to get to the centre nucleus where the cells are Disturbance to the two main bodies is limited to normal inspections The nuclei can be split, and given a queen cell when queen […]

Downloads Old

[…]form is based on the Galtee Bee Breeding Group’s ten column method of recording developed by Micheál Mac Giolla Coda  Tom Robinson’s Table  Download  This Microsoft Excel file was written by Angus Stokes and Albert Knight and provides an interactive way to prepare timetables for using the Jenter or Cupkit Cellplug Box. The original table written in 1995, but it has […]

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Methods for Rearing and Selection of Queens

[…]tests and the measurement of the most common selection characters are presented. Statistical methods and data preconditions for the estimation of breeding values which integrate pedigree and performance data from as many colonies as possible are described as the most efficient selection method for large populations. Alternative breeding programmes for small populations or certain scientific questions are briefly mentioned, including […]

Steve Rose Queen Rearing

This is a queen rearing method to persuade non-prolific and non-swarmy bees to raise queen cells on a regular basis through the season. (updated July 2015) Summary: Put queen excluder(s) and 2 half-width brood boxes over a standard colony when the first supers would normally be fitted. Wait for bees to start putting nectar in the half boxes and mature […]

BBOBI Group – March April 2019 Newsletter

[…]is ready to be deployed. The first modest batch of AMM grafts have been taken to standardise the method and educate the core team. Queen cages are being prepared, either plastic bought at the Tradex or Benton Cages constructed from timber. Mating preparations have started; making Queen Castles and attending lectures on Apidea management Activities we have planned: Swarm control […]

Caging Virgin Queens

[…]queens were tested in each of the 12 combinations. Queens were reared using standard beekeeping methods (Doolittle/grafting) and emerged from their cells into vials held in an incubator at 34C. All 12 combinations gave high survival (90 or 100%) for three days but only one method (wooden cage, with attendants, honey) gave 100% survival to day seven. Factors affecting queen […]

Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

[…]costs and just a little extra effort and it gives you the best change to get the best queens. The method is integrated in the normal beekeeping practice and integrates with swarm control, varroa control and harvesting honey. I have used the method myself for many years with a lot of success and I taught it to many beekeepers in […]
Read more » Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

Work with Bangor University

[…]time series study of colony wing morphometry in the study area, and to compare alternative methods such as landmark analysis with the current method of calculation of simple indices indicating native or non-native status. (DNA analysis) To evaluate the relative reliability of wing morphometric methods by comparing trait characteristics with DNA analyses, by characterizing the mitotype at the COI-COII locus […]

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[column-half-1] If more than one person at the same address wishes to be a BIBBA member: The first person at any address will pay the full BIBBA membership of £20 but any additional persons living at the same address can join as family members for the reduced rate of £10. If two people are paying together at the same time […]

BIM 38 – Spring 2012

[…]– Will Messenger Project Discovery – Terry Clare North Pennine Bee Group – Pritchard & Miller The Black Bees of Tasmania – Andrew Abrahams Stratford-upon-Avon BIG – Peter Edwards Native Dark Bee Breeding – Margie Ramsey News from the Groups – Jo Widdicombe News from BIPCo – Jo Widdicombe Queen Rearing Workshop – Mike Saunders Scottish Centenary Conference Sedbergh Breeding […]

BIM 36 – Summer 2011

[…]– Roger Patterson John Dews Obituary – various Book Review – Philip Denwood The Rose Hive Method: Challenging Conventional Beekeeping, by Tim Rowe. BIBBA Trustees BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]and finding a colony of uniform native appearance. The best way is to score your bees by using the method recommended by John Dews and Eric Milner in their publication Breeding Better Bees, using simple modern methods. This is a BIBBA Publication available from Northern Bee Books online. If you do not have or cannot obtain a copy, I can […]

Downloads

[…]Form This form is based on the Galtee Bee Breeding Group’s ten column method of recording developed by Micheál Mac Giolla Coda DOWNLOAD  Tom Robinson’s Table This Microsoft Excel file was written by Angus Stokes and Albert Knight and provides an interactive way to prepare timetables for using the Jenter or Cupkit Cellplug Box. The original table written in 1995; It […]

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BIBBA Monthly – September 2019

Queen Rearing – my preferred method by Jo Widdicombe Setting Up a Breeding Conservation Group BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

NatBIP News No2

[…]is right. The bees will rear queen cells in the queenless brood box. More details on this simple method in Section 5.1 of the NatBIP GUIDE at bibba.com Queen Rearing guidance If you didn’t catch this BIBBA webinar recently – “Understanding Queen Rearing Methods” by Roger Patterson. It provides a really solid overview of many of the queen rearing techniques […]

Bucks Berks & Oxon Bee Improvement (BBOBI ) – RG9

[…]drone comb in year two and may also be asked to provide a frame of larvae for grafting. Using this method we can have the maximum effect, using minimum resources. We encourage others to do the same with their own near native stock, to maximise the distribution of selected genetics in the local neighbourhood. contact Brian […]
Read more » Bucks Berks & Oxon Bee Improvement (BBOBI ) – RG9

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

[…]may still swarm! Simple queen propagation – there’s no need to worry initially, about complex methods of queen rearing (unless you want to). Simple splits can raise a lot of queens. When I first became a commercial Beekeeper, I had only 6 colonies but by splitting each of these, I had 32 by the end of the season (not much […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

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BIBBA communications are now online; we aim to produce occassional printed material. the overseas rate has been reduced to £20 membership is valid until 1st January next after completing your payment please go […]

News

[…]selection (selection by the beekeeper), we can produce a steady improvement in quality. This method works in harmony with nature and our bees will gradually evolve to produce good results in the current conditions. By constantly selecting the bees that do best, our bees will be constantly evolving to cope with changing environmental or climatic conditions. Why NatBIP needs your […]

Conserving black bees

[…]large-scale, carefully monitored and highly selective breeding programmes, im­provements by this method can only be small and incremental. However, over the decades progress has been good and crucially there have been no problems associated with genetic loss or loss of sex alleles. Brood pat­terns are solid and DNA analysis has further confirmed continued pres­ence of initial sex alleles.13, 14 Breeding […]

Adam Tofilski Webinars

[…]producing hybrids and mongrels. The identification is usually based on molecular or morphometric methods. Morphometric methods do not require sophisticated equipment and can be done by most beekeepers. The identification can be based on many body parts including, legs and mouthparts, however, identification based on forewing alone is easier. Originally, the identification of honey bee subspecies was based on cubital […]

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Using a Smoker

[…]finish. The part burnt fuel is good for starting the smoker next time. Lighting the smoker – my method. Empty the smoker out onto the ground. Sort out any partly burnt fuel from last time. Crumple up some paper, light it and drop it in the fire box, pumping the bellows until it is well alight. The choice of paper […]