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Live @ the Hive

[…]@ the Hive” has gained a good following, with viewers from a wide area, including the US. The weather makes dates and times of the sessions a little difficult to predict, so they may be at short notice. Remember to subscribe to our YouTube channel to be reminded of our latest broadcasts. Below you will find a playlist of previous […]

Native Honey Bees

[…]In my view it was caused by a pollen shortage where bees couldn’t forage due to poor flying weather. Longevity of both queens and workers. Non-prolific queens don’t need to be replaced regularly as prolific ones do. They are capable of heading productive colonies for the whole of their lives. It is said and my observations confirm, that workers from […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]but in some areas collection of honey is practiced without destruction of the nest and some honey gatherers even provide nest sites to which they transfer the whole colony. The lifestyle of Apis cerana is similar to that of the Western Honey bees and like Apis mellifera it is used in apiculture with modern moveable comb hives. The numerical strength […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]apparent crossbreeds. The natural beekeeping movement, as discussed by Brian Dennis and by me, is gathering momentum – it is if nothing else, cheap to operate, and arguably can lead to bees which are healthier and better adapted to their localities, while still yielding a reasonable honey crop. Philip Denwood Editor Bee Improvement and Conservation The Journal of the Bee […]

Queens: Collaboration and how to make it easy on yourself and your bees – by Karl Colyer

[…]breeder colonies in mid-August. It was a slight gamble where I live in Cheshire but the weather was fair and the outlook very similar. Roger mentioned that I was out of action from last September (2 months to get walking, a year to pass a medical to get my driving licence back and lots of mobility issues in between). The […]
Read more » Queens: Collaboration and how to make it easy on yourself and your bees – by Karl Colyer

BIBBA Monthly – December 2020

[…]winter approaches, everything quietens down – except for the webinars! The cooler and darker weather is firmly here now. I’m based in Cheshire and I’m not seeing any bees at the moment except for dead bees which are left on the chilly landing boards.  The one thing that is doing well is my To Do list for the winter. As […]

Webinars – Summary

Recordings of the majority of webinars are also available on our YouTube Channel Don’t forget to sign up here, for free, to learn more about our future […]

Home5

[…]most things is “Keep it simple”. Live @ the Hive Live outside broadcasts of hive inspections and apiary activities. Recordings available on youtube, subscribe to get reminders Upcoming Webinars Sign up, free of charge, to learn more about our future programmes. Previous Webinar Recordings Recommended YouTube There are a lot of beekeeping videos online. Some excellent; some dubious. An experienced […]

Education & Training

[…]“Keep it simple”. Live @ the Hive Live outside broadcasts of hive inspections and apiary activities. Recordings available on youtube, subscribe to get reminders Let's Go Beekeeping Roger Patterson gives practical beekeeping tips in this video series. BIBBA Publications We have a range of publications available to the public. They are available from all good beekeeping book suppliers and on […]

Home

[…]most things is “Keep it simple”. Live @ the Hive Live outside broadcasts of hive inspections and apiary activities. Recordings available on youtube, subscribe to get reminders Upcoming Webinars Sign up, free of charge, to learn more about our future programmes. Previous Webinar Recordings Recommended YouTube There are a lot of beekeeping videos online. Some excellent; some dubious. An experienced […]

August 2022 BIBBA Monthly

[…]years, if anything losses have reduced since I have been treatment free. It is noticeable that the treatment free beekeepers featured in the articles mentioned by Prof. Stephen Martin in his BBKA NEWS July 2022 article, would appear in the main to be using locally adapted or Native type honey bees.  It is my proposition that the development of natural […]

Roger Patterson

[…]in addition to arranging the lecture programmes for the Central Association of Bee-Keepers and the National Honey Show. Roger can often be seen in the company of his border collies Nell and Rosie. For any queries on events or education, please contact Roger 01403 […]

Roger Patterson “The Patterson Unit”

[…]four being ideal, are put into units, each having a support colony that provides anything needed, rather that interfering with productive colonies. This system works well for all beekeepers, whatever the number of colonies they have. Once set up, there are many more benefits than those originally intended, making the whole beekeeping operation more flexible, without the need for equipment […]

Pete Sutcliffe – “The hive as a processing centre”

[…]BBKA examinations and eventually achieved the accolade of “Master Beekeeper”. He is still rather diffident about this title, as the bees seem to be the masters a lot of the time! Pete was a member of the BBKA Examinations Board, a BBKA Trustee and chair of the BBKA’s Education and Husbandry Committee. He is a BBKA Correspondence Course Tutor, a […]
Read more » Pete Sutcliffe – “The hive as a processing centre”

Trisha Marlow “(The) Status Quo: Rocking all over the Hive

[…]in the Welsh Marches, breeding her own queens selectively. Some apiaries are close to ling heather, others to OSR, thus minimising the stress to man and bees of moving hives while giving a selection of honeys. With her partner Paul, Camlad Apiaries is run as a small, sustainable business supplying health food shops, delicatessens, village shops, and the most northerly castle in […]
Read more » Trisha Marlow “(The) Status Quo: Rocking all over the Hive

Queens – an example of collaboration between beekeepers, by Roger Patterson

[…]nature telling me something. Queens that aren’t what I want usually get the “boot treatment” at the earliest opportunity. I have found that being tolerant of them isn’t a good idea. If it is towards the end of the season, I may keep them to head a colony going into winter, but if they make it, they are usually the […]
Read more » Queens – an example of collaboration between beekeepers, by Roger Patterson

Colony Increase – The Roger Patterson Method

[…]increase a very easy and attainable process.I’m kicking myself that this wasn’t available at the beginning of the year as it’s just what was needed, so no guesses what I’ll be encouraging our association to do for our new bee keeping entrants. Roger explains everything very pragmatically and makes no drama of the process, or needing piles of kit. A […]
Read more » Colony Increase – The Roger Patterson Method

Brian Dennis

In 1976 I attended a beginners’ beekeeping course at the local Agricultural College. The course was run by the County Bee Instructor George Sommerville, an early member of BIBBA. I eventually purchased a hive & bees from a specialist in flea biology! The bees were excellent, although I did not realize this at the time. My interest in bees & […]

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]is marked and more importantly the year of her birth. Household gloves When using the heavy leather beekeepers gloves or gauntlets it is necessary to remove one or both gloves to catch and clip the queen. This is probably the main reason why many beekeepers are reluctant to either clip or mark their queens. At least that was so in […]

John Harding Queen Rearing

[…]every beekeeper should raise their own queens, it is only then you can call yourself a beekeeper rather than a keeper of bees. Everybody has their own system of beekeeping and queen rearing that suits them, often without much thought for what’s best for the honeybee, or the possibility of causing unnecessary stress to the colony. The main purpose of […]

Improving bees by raising your own queens

[…]be time spent at the bees, so bring clean protective clothing. It is asked that heavy gloves (leather or similar) are not worn, firstly to avoid the possibility of spreading foul brood and secondly to be able to handle and "feel" the bees without being clumsy. If gloves are worn, they should be new and lightweight, because queens and bees […]

Lecturers

[…]in the Welsh Marches, breeding her own queens selectively. Some apiaries are close to ling heather, others to OSR, thus minimising the stress to man and bees of moving hives while giving a selection of honeys. With her partner Paul, Camlad Apiaries is run as a small, sustainable business supplying health food shops, delicatessens, village shops, and the most northerly castle in […]

Ardnamurchan Jan 2016

[…]Queen rearing was therefore difficult as the colonies were depleted of natural stores and the weather was mostly too cold for mating, even on rare fine days. We hope for better conditions in 2016 and the successful rearing and mating of a larger number of queens. Demand for Amm queens is strong in Scotland where there is growing interest in […]

Some history of the East Midlands group

[…]as a bush or small tree. This reduces losses due to queens returning to the wrong nuc. In normal weather conditions we expect queens to be mated and laying within two weeks. Planning based on this presumption, means having more queen cells ready to put in the same mini-nucs two weeks after the queens have been on site. So a […]

BIM 47 – Autumn 2016

From the President – Jo Widdicombe Now we have to look at the next 12 months and what we are going to do. I believe we should be aiming for 3 magazines per year, one every four months. 53 AGM Notice the AGM will take place at Harper Adams University TF10 8NB on Sunday 9th April 2017 From the Chair […]

The black bee, an increasingly rare pearl

[…]most important in the short term: the Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) in the 1930s, for gathering rapeseed; the Caucasian bee (Apis mellifera caucasica) in the 1950s, their longer tubes being able to gather clover; Buckfast, a strain from multiple crosses, operated by a monk in the abbey of the same name. There is no national or European legal measure which makes it […]

BIM 43 – Spring 2014

[…]attending, because these in my view are the future of BIBBA. Moonlight Mating – Philip Denwood At the 2012 SICAMM Conference in Landquart, Switzerland, a presentation by Gerhard Glock and Thomas Ruppel of the German Dark Bee Association included some details of a system of mating isolation by time of day (“Mondschein”or “Moonlight”) mating… Pure Mating by Time Isolation – […]

BIM 36 – Summer 2011

[…]– Will Messenger Inbreeding part 2 – Dorian Pritchard Simple Queen Rearing – Dinah Sweet The Native Bee – Pam Hunter Dave Cushman – Roger Patterson John Dews Obituary – various Book Review – Philip Denwood The Rose Hive Method: Challenging Conventional Beekeeping, by Tim Rowe. BIBBA Trustees BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for […]

BIM 45 – Spring 2015

[…]of exotic animals and diseases. Echoes from the past I have ascertained beyond doubt that the good old British bee still exists . . . 2014 Conference – Margaret Murdin There were three lecture streams with each stream providing five lectures per day. So that gave me a choice of 45 lectures. BIBBA/SICAMM Conference – Roger Patterson I think it […]

BIM 32 – Autumn 2009

The Harding Hive Debris Floor – John Harding I wanted as much of the debris to fall out free of the hive, specifically varroa, and show my design for a slatted floor Three fertile queens in one colony – Roger Patterson Follow up of the three queens that came through the 2008/9 winter Variation in susceptibility to bee diseases among […]

BIM 50 – Winter 2017

[…]first native bee reserve Mount Edgcumbe – Mark Edwards The apiary looks picturesque as the hives are situated in an old Victorian garden BIBBA Conference – Roger Patterson An interesting programme is being planned with three streams More Queen Rearing Myths Busted– Roger Patterson I have been raising queens for 50 years, and not always having ideal conditions I have […]

Albert Knight

[…]the Summer Course at Gormanston, Ireland.   At the ceilidh he recited from memory A.B. (Banjo) Paterson’s poem The Man from Snowy River – all 13 verses without hardly a hesitation.   Perhaps the last lines are appropriate: The man from Snowy River is a household word to-day, And the stockmen tell the story of his ride.   Roger Patterson: I often […]

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

[…]colonies two frames – one in from either end. Introducing Queens Simple queen introduction – rather than picking a queen off the frame and putting her in a cage, with or without attendants, it is far simpler to use the newspaper method to combine a queenless colony with a nucleus with a newly mated queen and the success rate is […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

Webinars – Season Two

[…]“ Presentation:  “Dead Bees Don’t Buzz – Surviving the Winter “ View Recording – Roger Patterson – “Dead Bees Don’t Buzz – Surviving the Winter “ Tuesday 25th August 7:30pm – Lynfa Davies – “The Mystery of Mating” Presentation:  “The Mystery of Mating”. View Recording – Lynfa Davies – “The Mystery of Mating” Tuesday 1st September 7:30pm – Roger Patterson […]

Using a Smoker

[…]well will ensure it will quickly go out. It should be ready for trouble free lighting next time. Roger […]

Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

[…]as long as adequate food is provided. A queen rearing colony should be provided fed unless the weather is fine and an abundance of nectar and pollen are available. Splitting a colony to produce queen cells There are numerous ways of producing queen cells with this method. One method is described below. A queen has been selected as suitable to […]

Recommended YouTube Videos

[…]factual and sound information featuring good, knowledgeable and experienced beekeepers. Unfortunately there are many of dubious accuracy, giving poor advice that may be inappropriate for our conditions. As there is no vetting procedure to display educational material online, what is the inexperienced beekeeper to believe? BIBBA strongly believes that beekeeping information should be high quality, so we have made it […]

NatBIP News No3

[…]Officer As we put this NatBIP News edition together, we are forecast near-Mediterranean weather across most parts of the UK, and more importantly for beekeepers, quite a sustained period of warmth over several days.  Perhaps these are the right conditions to finally get inside the hive and take a look at what’s been happening during the winter. One of my […]

NatBIP News No5

[…]Another week or two would have spelt disaster on quite a large scale. Fortunately, the fine weather has come just in time and the bees are now, at last, bringing nectar and pollen in. Being able to cope with whatever nature throws at the bees is a very important quality and is the principle behind ‘local adaptation’. Through ‘survival of […]