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Live @ the Hive

[…]@ the Hive” has gained a good following, with viewers from a wide area, including the US. The weather makes dates and times of the sessions a little difficult to predict, so they may be at short notice. Remember to subscribe to our YouTube channel to be reminded of our latest broadcasts. Below you will find a playlist of previous […]

Pete Sutcliffe – “The hive as a processing centre”

[…]BBKA examinations and eventually achieved the accolade of “Master Beekeeper”. He is still rather diffident about this title, as the bees seem to be the masters a lot of the time! Pete was a member of the BBKA Examinations Board, a BBKA Trustee and chair of the BBKA’s Education and Husbandry Committee. He is a BBKA Correspondence Course Tutor, a […]
Read more » Pete Sutcliffe – “The hive as a processing centre”

Trisha Marlow “(The) Status Quo: Rocking all over the Hive

[…]in the Welsh Marches, breeding her own queens selectively. Some apiaries are close to ling heather, others to OSR, thus minimising the stress to man and bees of moving hives while giving a selection of honeys. With her partner Paul, Camlad Apiaries is run as a small, sustainable business supplying health food shops, delicatessens, village shops, and the most northerly castle in […]
Read more » Trisha Marlow “(The) Status Quo: Rocking all over the Hive

Brian Dennis

In 1976 I attended a beginners’ beekeeping course at the local Agricultural College. The course was run by the County Bee Instructor George Sommerville, an early member of BIBBA. I eventually purchased a hive & bees from a specialist in flea biology! The bees were excellent, although I did not realize this at the time. My interest in bees & […]

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]is marked and more importantly the year of her birth. Household gloves When using the heavy leather beekeepers gloves or gauntlets it is necessary to remove one or both gloves to catch and clip the queen. This is probably the main reason why many beekeepers are reluctant to either clip or mark their queens. At least that was so in […]

Native Honey Bees

[…]In my view it was caused by a pollen shortage where bees couldn’t forage due to poor flying weather. Longevity of both queens and workers. Non-prolific queens don’t need to be replaced regularly as prolific ones do. They are capable of heading productive colonies for the whole of their lives. It is said and my observations confirm, that workers from […]

Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

[…]but in some areas collection of honey is practiced without destruction of the nest and some honey gatherers even provide nest sites to which they transfer the whole colony. The lifestyle of Apis cerana is similar to that of the Western Honey bees and like Apis mellifera it is used in apiculture with modern moveable comb hives. The numerical strength […]
Read more » Honey bee origins, evolution & diversity – Ashleigh Milner

Ardnamurchan Jan 2016

[…]Queen rearing was therefore difficult as the colonies were depleted of natural stores and the weather was mostly too cold for mating, even on rare fine days. We hope for better conditions in 2016 and the successful rearing and mating of a larger number of queens. Demand for Amm queens is strong in Scotland where there is growing interest in […]

Some history of the East Midlands group

[…]as a bush or small tree. This reduces losses due to queens returning to the wrong nuc. In normal weather conditions we expect queens to be mated and laying within two weeks. Planning based on this presumption, means having more queen cells ready to put in the same mini-nucs two weeks after the queens have been on site. So a […]

The black bee, an increasingly rare pearl

[…]most important in the short term: the Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) in the 1930s, for gathering rapeseed; the Caucasian bee (Apis mellifera caucasica) in the 1950s, their longer tubes being able to gather clover; Buckfast, a strain from multiple crosses, operated by a monk in the abbey of the same name. There is no national or European legal measure which makes it […]

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]apparent crossbreeds. The natural beekeeping movement, as discussed by Brian Dennis and by me, is gathering momentum – it is if nothing else, cheap to operate, and arguably can lead to bees which are healthier and better adapted to their localities, while still yielding a reasonable honey crop. Philip Denwood Editor Bee Improvement and Conservation The Journal of the Bee […]

Queens: Collaboration and how to make it easy on yourself and your bees – by Karl Colyer

[…]breeder colonies in mid-August. It was a slight gamble where I live in Cheshire but the weather was fair and the outlook very similar. Roger mentioned that I was out of action from last September (2 months to get walking, a year to pass a medical to get my driving licence back and lots of mobility issues in between). The […]
Read more » Queens: Collaboration and how to make it easy on yourself and your bees – by Karl Colyer

BIBBA Monthly – December 2020

[…]winter approaches, everything quietens down – except for the webinars! The cooler and darker weather is firmly here now. I’m based in Cheshire and I’m not seeing any bees at the moment except for dead bees which are left on the chilly landing boards.  The one thing that is doing well is my To Do list for the winter. As […]

Webinars – Summary

Recordings of the majority of webinars are also available on our YouTube Channel Don’t forget to sign up here, for free, to learn more about our future […]

Home5

[…]most things is “Keep it simple”. Live @ the Hive Live outside broadcasts of hive inspections and apiary activities. Recordings available on youtube, subscribe to get reminders Upcoming Webinars Sign up, free of charge, to learn more about our future programmes. Previous Webinar Recordings Recommended YouTube There are a lot of beekeeping videos online. Some excellent; some dubious. An experienced […]

BIBBA YouTube Videos

[…]Started | The Early Years | Intermediate/Advanced | Queen rearing | General Interest | Live @ the Hive | NatBIP Just Started or about to For those who are considering starting beekeeping or who have just started, perhaps in their first full year. The Early Years – Sound Foundations in Beekeeping These titles will be suitable for beekeepers who have […]

Education & Training

[…]“Keep it simple”. Live @ the Hive Live outside broadcasts of hive inspections and apiary activities. Recordings available on youtube, subscribe to get reminders Let's Go Beekeeping Roger Patterson gives practical beekeeping tips in this video series. BIBBA Publications We have a range of publications available to the public. They are available from all good beekeeping book suppliers and on […]

Home

[…]most things is “Keep it simple”. Live @ the Hive Live outside broadcasts of hive inspections and apiary activities. Recordings available on youtube, subscribe to get reminders Upcoming Webinars Sign up, free of charge, to learn more about our future programmes. Previous Webinar Recordings Recommended YouTube There are a lot of beekeeping videos online. Some excellent; some dubious. An experienced […]

Why do the bees rear so many drones?

[…]of the large number of ‘useless’ drones is often raised and occasionally answered by saying that the bees must know what they are doing, even if we don’t always understand it. However much we know, there is always more that we don’t. Like most organisms in nature, the bees live close to the brink; they have no safety net to […]

August 2022 BIBBA Monthly

[…]years, if anything losses have reduced since I have been treatment free. It is noticeable that the treatment free beekeepers featured in the articles mentioned by Prof. Stephen Martin in his BBKA NEWS July 2022 article, would appear in the main to be using locally adapted or Native type honey bees.  It is my proposition that the development of natural […]

Jutland Visit

[…]telling us. On Friday, we visited Knud Hvam’s home farm, which previously belonged to his grandfather. The premises are large with space to store equipment and process honey for 2000 colonies, all on standard Dadant equipment. His hives and indeed all the equipment we saw in Denmark are made of polystyrene are neatly stacked and contain frames with new foundation. […]

Laesoe 2004

[…]by the late middle ages, largely for use as fuel in the island’s saltworks, leaving areas of heather moor and saltmarsh with its distinctive flora, along with agricultural land. A single salt works survives, still run on medieval lines, of which we had a fascinating tour. In modern times large parts of the island have been reforested with coniferous woodland. […]

John Harding Queen Rearing

[…]every beekeeper should raise their own queens, it is only then you can call yourself a beekeeper rather than a keeper of bees. Everybody has their own system of beekeeping and queen rearing that suits them, often without much thought for what’s best for the honeybee, or the possibility of causing unnecessary stress to the colony. The main purpose of […]

A Native Dark Bee Project

[…]possible to breed pure queens from the previous year’s out-mated mothers.) Unfortunately the weather that summer was very poor and all virgins were lost or became drone layers. It was also decided that the coastal apiary was no longer sufficiently remote from other apiaries to give satisfactory mating success by drone flooding using drone comb in selected hives. Grafted queen […]

East Midlands Bee Improvement Group-NG11

[…]conditions, may be applied when collective agreement determines so.   All those meeting together at the Group Apiary are committed to the same aims. This enables us to share bee keeping experiences and understandings whilst evolving local near enough native bees that can improve the stock in our personal apiaries, and eventually other beekeepers in the Vale of Belvoir and […]

Eoghan Mac Giolla Coda “Producing Honey Under Difficult Conditions”

[…]east coast. As a fourth-generation beekeeper, he learned his craft through helping his father with the famous Galtee black bees of Co. Tipperary. After settling in Co. Louth, he embarked on his own beekeeping enterprise using local strains of native Irish honey bee. He is Education Officer for Co. Louth Beekeepers’ Association, helping organise classes for beginners and improvers and […]
Read more » Eoghan Mac Giolla Coda “Producing Honey Under Difficult Conditions”

Improving bees by raising your own queens

[…]be time spent at the bees, so bring clean protective clothing. It is asked that heavy gloves (leather or similar) are not worn, firstly to avoid the possibility of spreading foul brood and secondly to be able to handle and "feel" the bees without being clumsy. If gloves are worn, they should be new and lightweight, because queens and bees […]

Lecturers

[…]in the Welsh Marches, breeding her own queens selectively. Some apiaries are close to ling heather, others to OSR, thus minimising the stress to man and bees of moving hives while giving a selection of honeys. With her partner Paul, Camlad Apiaries is run as a small, sustainable business supplying health food shops, delicatessens, village shops, and the most northerly castle in […]

Bacteria Help Honey Bee Larvae

[…] Story Images Molecular biologist Vanessa Corby-Harris and microbial ecologist Kirk E. Anderson at the ARS Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Tucson, Arizona, have named a new species of bacteria—Parasaccharibacter apium. An Acetobacteraceae so far found only in honey bees and their hives, it appears to give honey bee larvae a significantly better chance of surviving to become pupae.Honey […]

Events

[…]native”). Events are of different duration and can take a number of forms, both with and without live bees. They are often run in conjunction with local hosts, mainly BKAs. We have standard events that with minor adjustments can be staged in any locality. Dates and details of BIBBA events that are planned will be added to the website and […]

BBOBI Group – March April 2019 Newsletter

[…]to further the education portion of our aims. Interesting discussions included lectures attended at the Spring Convention and understanding sources of black bees at stud stock. Questions about crop spraying raised interest in this website: https://beeconnected.org.uk/ Visit to Samlesbury Hall between Blackburn and Preston in the Ribble Valley https://thebeecentre.org/home/ Affiliated with BIBBA, Gearing up for Sunday 19th May – World Bee […]

Biodiversity and Local Partnerships

[…]Pharma in investing in trial registers and industry funded research. Norman Carreck; a researcher at the University of Sussex and Science director of the International Bee Research Association COLOSS; and himself a beekeeper since the age of 15 years, flagged up the importance of preserving native honey bee stocks (Apis mellifera mellifera) as these are best adapted to UK climatic […]

Michael Maunsell “The Drone – More to its life than we may think?”

[…]study of beekeeping and carpentry to make a suitable home for my new tenants. Naively I assumed that the bees would be delivered to me. Unfortunately I had to cut down the tree and remove the bees myself. With a background in science I set about experimenting with new charges. I learned a great deal of my beekeeping from my […]
Read more » Michael Maunsell “The Drone – More to its life than we may think?”

Jim Vivian-Griffiths “Mating Biology of Honey Bees”

[…]a Master Beekeeper in 2014, winning the Wax Chandlers Award. I passed the Lectureship Examination at the Gormanston Summer School in 2015 becoming a Certified FIBKA Lecturer. I am a BBKA assessor for Basic and General Husbandry. I have been beekeeping with my wife Val, who is also a Master Beekeeper, for 17 years. We live in Monmouth and run […]
Read more » Jim Vivian-Griffiths “Mating Biology of Honey Bees”

Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

[…]course about bees and beekeeping. My wife and I have a professional apiary and sell products from the hive under the name La Reine (French for Queen), queens, nucs and provide pollination services. Lecture Title: “Queen Rearing Simplified” Queen rearing simplified is about rearing the best quality queens and is useful for small and medium sized apiaries. The method is […]
Read more » Jeroen Vorstman “Queen Rearing Simplified”

Tony Maggs “Bee Farming with Native/Near Native Bees”

[…]methods are different to that of the hobbyist running a few hives and selling a few pots of honey at the gate. So where do their bees come from? Imported? Home bred? Mongrel swarms? Native (Apis mellifera mellifera – Amm) or Near Native. Probably a mixture of all of these and for different reasons. But why don’t more opt for […]
Read more » Tony Maggs “Bee Farming with Native/Near Native Bees”

Huw Evans “Electronic monitoring as a tool for better beekeeping and queen breeding”

[…]monitoring with other parameters such as brood temperature, humidity, hive weight and apiary weather conditions. The data collected offers a beekeeper/queen breeder a powerful tool to examine the colony and queen conditions without disturbing the bees. Weight data can be used to calculate the “adjusted production figure” (average harvested by each apiary minus the harvest of each hive) for each […]
Read more » Huw Evans “Electronic monitoring as a tool for better beekeeping and queen breeding”

Phil Chandler “Balanced Beekeeping: Top Bars, Eco Floors and Black Bees”

[…]black bees. With your help, I will attempt to address the following questions: How can we create the most beneficial conditions for our bees, without having to climb trees? What are the advantages of top bar hives for bees and beekeeper? What is the point of balance between the bees’ needs and ours, as beekeepers? Do native and near native […]
Read more » Phil Chandler “Balanced Beekeeping: Top Bars, Eco Floors and Black Bees”

BIM 47 – Autumn 2016

From the President – Jo Widdicombe Now we have to look at the next 12 months and what we are going to do. I believe we should be aiming for 3 magazines per year, one every four months. 53 AGM Notice the AGM will take place at Harper Adams University TF10 8NB on Sunday 9th April 2017 From the Chair […]

The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

[…]body promoting nature conservation south of the border, Natural England, whose staff maintain that the honey bee was introduced by man some 1500 years ago, is therefore not “native” to Britain, and should therefore be excluded from nature reserves. Another and more serious case of flying in the face of the evidence is that of the “Isle of Wight Disease”, […]
Read more » The Dark Bee Apis mellifera mellifera in the United Kingdom

BIM 43 – Spring 2014

[…]attending, because these in my view are the future of BIBBA. Moonlight Mating – Philip Denwood At the 2012 SICAMM Conference in Landquart, Switzerland, a presentation by Gerhard Glock and Thomas Ruppel of the German Dark Bee Association included some details of a system of mating isolation by time of day (“Mondschein”or “Moonlight”) mating… Pure Mating by Time Isolation – […]

BIM 36 – Summer 2011

[…]– Will Messenger Inbreeding part 2 – Dorian Pritchard Simple Queen Rearing – Dinah Sweet The Native Bee – Pam Hunter Dave Cushman – Roger Patterson John Dews Obituary – various Book Review – Philip Denwood The Rose Hive Method: Challenging Conventional Beekeeping, by Tim Rowe. BIBBA Trustees BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for […]