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John Harding Queen Rearing

The main purpose of this systemis its versatility and to have an additional use so you always double its value in purpose, and it's not lying around for the best part of the year unused. Given the choice honeybees prefer vertical narrow empty spaces with unlimited depth, and just enough space to build 5 or6 combs side by side...

John Dew’s Views – the Best Bee

There is a tendency amongst some beekeepers to believe that the “grass is greener on the other side of the fence”, that imported bees are superior to the indigenous bee

BIM 33 – Winter 2010

Cornbrook revisited – Sandra Unwin Local Queen Programme – Roger Patterson Assessment of colonies – Jo Widdicombe The BIBBA record card – Philip Denwood Groups – Terry Clare A model agreement – Terry Clare Queen rearing group – Roger Patterson Warnholz Mini BiVo nuc – Dave Cushman The Harding Mini Nuc – John Harding Bee improvement – Roger Patterson Entombment…

BIM 32 – Autumn 2009

The Harding Hive Debris Floor - John Harding Three fertile queens in one colony - Roger Patterson Variation in susceptibility to bee diseases among European races of honey bees - Dinah Sweet Isle of Wight disease in Warwickshire - Brian Milward Griff Jenkins - obituary by Albert Knight Queens entombed in wax - Norman Walsh Reply to Robin Dean’s article…

BIM 31 – Spring 2009

The Harding queen raising system. John Harding A tribute to Gordon Hartshorn. Tom Rowlands Beekeeping in Northumberland. Dorian Pritchard Three fertile queens in one colony. Roger Patterson Brother Adam and the dark bee. Dorian Pritchard Breeding Group news. Jo Widdicombe The Bee Improvement Programme for Cornwall. Jo Widdicombe Survey of native bees. Roger Patterson Laboratory of Apiculture and Social Insects.…

BIM Index Issues 1-25

Bee Improvement Magazine: subject index. Issues 1-25 to search the index type Ctrl+f (Cmd+f on Mac) to open search box Africa Beekman, Dr. Madeleine "The Cape invaders." 9, 12 Allergies Tarzi, Dr. M. D. "Allergy to hymenoptera venom." 9, 8 Apis mellifera mellifera Burry, Harris "Conserving biodiversity in the dark European honey bee." 2, 8 Crudgington, Dr. H.G. "Hygienic behaviour…

Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

Queen Rearing Methods There are so many techniques of queen rearing, and so much has been written about them, that it may seem unwise to add any more. Studying too many methods can be a source of much confusion and leave one overwhelmed and unsure of how to proceed. Like most things in beekeeping, the best way to learn is…

Sandringham Report 2021

Sandringham Native Bee Project One of BIBBA’s Members, Eric Marshall, approached the Trustees to see if they would support a project to breed and rear native bees. Eric lives close to the Royal Sandringham Estate and it has been a key aim of BIBBA to develop a Special Apiary Project at Sandringham that would fit in with HRH the Prince…

Native Honey Bees

It is fairly certain that the Dark European Honey Bee, Apis mellifera mellifera, has been native to mainland Britain since before the closing of the Channel Landbridge, when sea levels rose following the last Ice Age. They became isolated and adapted to the different conditions they found themselves in.

A Native Dark Bee Project

Margie Ramsay reports on a project reintroducing A.m.m. to a reserve in Scotland. Update July 2015 In 1905, just before the First World War there was a 20 year long bee plague called Isle of Wight disease which was considered by many, including bee breeder Brother Adam, to have eradicated the native subspecies of dark European honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera…

BIM 47 – Autumn 2016

Queen raising – Alan Brown Burzyan wild-hive honeybees – R. A. Ilyasov, M. N. Kosarov. A. Neal, F. G. Yumaguzhin Queen rearing on the Isle of Man – John Evans The SMARTBEES project – Jo Widdicombe Conferences and Workshops – Roger Patterson Working for a better bee – Mark Edwards Polynucs – Peter Edwards QR at Keepers Cottage – Peter…

BIM 48 – Winter 2016/17

Miniature tracking device – Paul Cross BIBBA Conference – Viki Cuthbertson Quest to Improve the Manx honey bee – Johnny Kipps, et al Bee house on the Isle-of-Man – Roger Patterson BIBBA Conference; some thoughts – R Patterson Varroa resistance – Gareth John Dark bees in Cornwall – Bob Black Ardnamurchan native bees – Kate Atchley . Queen raising criteria…

BIM 43 – Spring 2014

BIFA Days – Roger Patterson Moonlight Mating – Philip Denwood Pure Mating by Time Isolation – John E Dews Ownership of a Swarm – Brian Dennis Annual General Meeting Agenda – Secretary Annual Accounts – Treasurer Trustees Report – Chairman Draft Minutes – Secretary BIFA meeting in Sussex – James Norfolk Book Review – Philip Denwood Patron Saints – Brian…

BIM 42 – Winter 2013

Dark Bee Reserve – Philip Denwood BIBBA Groups News – Jo Widdicombe Whither goest thou? – Brian Dennis Are you a Natural Beekeeper? – Brian Dennis A Broader Perspective – Dorian Pritchard Honey with a Buzz – Trisha Marlow Book Review – Philip Denwood Some thoughts on Grafting – Roger Patterson Honey Bee Improvement – John E Dews Bee Improvement…

BIM 37 – Spring 2012

What’s in a Name – Will Messenger A Proposal – Jo Widdicombe The BIBBA Constitution Genetic Influence – David Campbell Project Discovery – Terry Clare A Bright Future – Dorian Pritchard Dave Cushman’s Website – Roger Patterson Wing Morphometry – Peter Edwards Galtee Bee Breeding Group – Mary Ryan John Dews Update – Tony Jefferson

BIM 36 – Summer 2011

Update on Morphometry – Peter Edwards Beekeeping in Orkney – Jannine Hazelhurst The way forward – Will Messenger Inbreeding part 2 – Dorian Pritchard Simple Queen Rearing – Dinah Sweet The Native Bee – Pam Hunter Dave Cushman – Roger Patterson John Dews Obituary – various Book Review – Philip Denwood BIBBA Trustees

BIM 34 – Spring 2010

BIBBA Handbook – David Allen Beekeeping notes – Willie Robson Small scale queen rearing – John Dews Expansion & queen rearing – Chris Broad Queen rearing on a small scale – Tom Robinson JZBZ frame bar – Roger Patterson Inbreeding – Tom Robinson Pesticides and colony losses – Eric Mussen Isle of Man workshop – Doris Fischler A note on…

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

From the President – Jo Widdicombe Trials and Tribulations – Frank Hilton Are you a Natural Beekeeper? – Brian Dennis Natural Beekeeping – Philip Denwood Racial Profiling of Mongrels – Paul Honigmann Bee Improvement and QR – R Patterson History of Manx beekeeping – Cilla Platt Making Increase – Brian Dennis Locally Adapted Bees – Wally Shaw Bee Races in…

BIM 30 – Winter 2008

Why the native bee is the best bee for the British climate. John E. Dews Discoidal shift. John E. Dews My approach to bee improvement. Roger Patterson Is the Dark Bee really native to Britain and Ireland? Dorian Pritchard The Federation of Irish Beekeepers' Associations (FIBKA) and BBKA examination systems Breeding Groups Secretary. Jo Widdicombe The one that nearly got…

BIM 28 – Autumn 2007

Open Day at Cornbrook Bee Farm - Sandra Unwin Lancashire Queen Rearing Workshop - Ray Dowson The Carniolan Bee - Brian Milward Inbreeding in the Honeybee - Dorian Pritchard Galtee Bee Breeders' Group Queen Rearing Workshop - Claire Chavasse Obituary: Claire Chavasse - Micheál Mac Giolla Coda Gormanston and BIBBA - Terry Clare BIBBA General Meeting, Gormanston - John Hendrie…

Albert Knight

an appreciation of one of BIBBA's stalwarts, by Brian P. Dennis and Roger Patterson.

Book title

This month’s download is from 1920 and is called “The Natural History of the Bee”, written by John Anderson. As well as some lovely hand-drawn details of bee anatomy, there is another book tagged on from page 36 called “How to Handle Bees”, from the same author. You can download the book here.

East Midlands 1998

Use of plastic foundation in the Apidea mini-nucs Use of Syrup instead of candy in Mini-nucs Use of cut comb containers for candy Grafting using a magnifier and torch Preparation of cell raising colonies Use of a cell transporter Use of an incubator for hatching queen cells