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John Harding Queen Rearing

[…]and at a height that is agreeable to you. The base is set up on the stand and made up of three 5 frame nucleus bodies end-to-end that are connected by two 150mm lengths of 50mm (or larger) diameter plastic tubes. The tubes go through holes bored in the adjoining ends of the boxes which will allow the bees to […]

Some history of the East Midlands group

[…]winter, ready to use it next season. This he has cut up to size for cementing into the plastic frames of the mini-nucs, and having made up a sample I am impressed with its strength. At the end of each season, all that will be required is to scrape the wax comb off, back to the plastic foundation. In his […]

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

[…]are methods of minimising the downsides of both. 6) What mating nuc will you use? Three frame nuc needs more resources in terms of bees but is more successful. Mini nucs require fewer bees but are less successful and need more attention. 7) What method will you use to introduce your queens into their final colony? In the next article […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part two

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

[…]Fried 16 B4 Press Release – Plymouth University 21 SICAMM Conference – Eoghan Mac Giolla Coda 22 Intelligence v. Chemical Responses – Brian Dennis 27 This is a non-smoking area – Brian Dennis 28 Editorial Following on from the Manx theme of the previous issue, we have an article from Cilla Platt on the history of beekeeping in the Isle […]

Bees for Sale

[…]to Create Your Own: NatBIP Guide Roger’s “Free Bees and Queens for Everyone” roadshow. Two Frame Nucs Contact a Local BIBBA Group: We have a number of Bee Improvement Groups around the UK. Often these groups have surplus bees and queens. Click here to find your nearest group. Members wishing to sell bees can put a notice on the website. […]

Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

[…]best method for splitting is to find the queen and make up a nuc with her (Frame of brood, shake 2 frames of bees in if staying in same apiary, frame of food and make up with spare empty comb or foundation, feed next day.) The bees in the now queenless colony will create emergency queen cells on the comb. […]
Read more » Bee Improvement Strategies – Kevin Thorn -part one

Queens: Collaboration and how to make it easy on yourself and your bees – by Karl Colyer

[…]in introducing a lot of bees very quickly. I’m sure you appreciate that having to make up 30 nucs at short notice can be quite challenging. Now, when I say that it didn’t entirely work, I need to clarify that. In May, I had two queens to use on my personal bee improvement programme. Now, I would say that I […]
Read more » Queens: Collaboration and how to make it easy on yourself and your bees – by Karl Colyer

Section 4.14 – NatBIP 1 Record Card Instructions

[…]columns can be assessed at each inspection, but others need only be used when appropriate. 2021: Date of inspection Insp. by: Inspected by – useful if working in a group or there are different beekeepers involved. Col. Size: Colony Size – In terms of bees covering frames in brood box and super e.g 0.7 + 0.3 would be bees covering […]
Read more » Section 4.14 – NatBIP 1 Record Card Instructions

Section 5.1 – Queen Rearing Methods

[…]later sealed queen cells can be utilised as one wishes. For example, Hive 1 could be split into 2, 3 or 4 nucs making sure each nuc has a comb with at least one sealed queen cell, some brood and stores (feed as necessary). Nucs unlikely to swarm as relatively weak. Or, cells could be harvested by carefully cutting out […]

East Midlands 1998

[…]changes we made during this past season, although we did make minor changes such as taping down nuc doors and cover boards before making up the nucs. This prevented accidental loss of bees during the four days of confinement. Over the years we have kept a record of the many tips that we have found to be of help in […]

Sandringham Report 2021

[…]used one this season. Being on my own I moved two single brood box colonies on site in February 2021. Late in February, fellow BIBBA Member Kevin Thorn gave a presentation about the Aberton Project to West Norfolk and King’s Lynn Beekeeping Association (WNKLBA). There was considerable interest and arising from that meeting three local beekeepers expressed interest in the […]

Let’s Go Beekeeping!

[…]channel: Preparing supers for extraction; Removing unwanted food from brood combs; Making up a two frame nuc; Roger’s inspection kit; cold or warm way?; Protecting a queen cell; Assembling national frames and boxes; and, most recently, the Toggle hive strap. For three days, except for a change of clothes, this is how we were dressed. The bees were a delight. […]

Find, Mark & Clip the Queen

[…]scan each frame for the presence of the queen as it is removed from the brood chamber. This frame can then be placed in an empty nucleus box, which is covered over with a cloth, for the time being. In order to make more room for inspection it is advisable to remove a second frame from the brood chamber and […]

Laesoe 2004

[…]non-jumpiness and steadiness of the bees on the comb. It was the same in Sweden 2000 and Poland 2002; and yet we still see the dark bee castigated for its bad temper! Cool-air clustering for heat conservation, a well-known Dark Bee character, was also demonstrated (Fig. 3). In a short but packed programme of talks, Danish researcher Klaus Langschwager gave […]

Native Honey Bees

[…]avoid, but we now know much more about the nutritional benefits of pollen. In the 12 months April 2012-April 2013 in the U.K colonies were in a poor state. In my view it was caused by a pollen shortage where bees couldn’t forage due to poor flying weather. Longevity of both queens and workers. Non-prolific queens don’t need to be […]

A Native Dark Bee Project

[…]from some of these Scottish mainland A.m.m. colonies and used to graft queens between 2010 – 2012. These queens were ultimately used to establish colonies of A.m.m. at the Scottish Natural Heritage Reserve in Kinlochewe, which was achieved without the purchase or removal of any colonies to prevent depletion of the source apiaries. I would like to thank the beekeepers […]

Steve Rose Queen Rearing

[…]film over the queen excluder and under the half box with the brood etc and remove the grafting frame. Between 3 and 24 hours later graft young larvae into the grafting frame and return it between the brood and pollen. Leave the other half box on its own queen excluder and hence accessible to the bees below. Day 3 or […]

Leek and Moorlands – ST9

[…]been raising queens for over 30 years and welcome beekeepers of all levels of experience. Plans In 2018 we used the Miller method for cell raising, and grafed larvae and also used the Jenter  system..  We used Apidea mini-nucs for mating.  We also trained 4 members in instrumental insemination. Further Info You can see full details and register for information […]

BIM 34 – Spring 2010

[…]& queen rearing – Chris Broad Queen rearing on a small scale – Tom Robinson JZBZ frame bar – Roger Patterson Inbreeding – Tom Robinson Pesticides and colony losses – Eric Mussen Isle of Man workshop – Doris Fischler A note on MorphPlot – Peter Edwards Galtee Group AGM – Mary Ryan Helen Sanders – David Allen BIBBA Conference BIBBA […]

BIM 33 – Winter 2010

[…]Clare A model agreement – Terry Clare Queen rearing group – Roger Patterson Warnholz Mini BiVo nuc – Dave Cushman The Harding Mini Nuc – John Harding Bee improvement – Roger Patterson Entombment follow-up – Dave Cushman BBKA Forum – Roger Patterson Morphometry Course – Dinah Sweet BIBBA members can download a pdf copy of the full magazine for personal […]

BIBBA Open Day – Improve Your Bees

[…]handling, assessment and recording Methods of raising queen cells Making up and managing standard frame nuclei, queen and cell introduction Cell raising methods – queenless colony – queenright colony – cell starter, […]

Sustainability – Bees and Queens for Everyone using low-cost, simple methods

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities.  Benefits of teaching apiaries. Producing bees and queens in teaching apiaries.  Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop.  Including queen […]
Read more » Sustainability – Bees and Queens for Everyone using low-cost, simple methods

Sustainable Bees & Queens

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens : Midlands

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens : East Anglia

[…]event (10.00am-4.00pm) costs £10/head (around 30% of the price of one queen and 5-10% of a nuc!). Refreshments will be provided, but please provide your own lunch. Booking must be made in advance. [tt-event url=’https://www.tickettailor.com/new-order/215507/9050/ref/website_widget/’ minimal=’false’ bg_fill=’true’ show_logo=’true’ […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens – South West

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

Sustainable Bees & Queens – South East

[…]queen rearing. Simple queen rearing methods. Simple and efficient ways to produce nuclei. Suggested methods for BKAs to supply bees and queens to members/beginners. Methods for small and larger quantities. Benefits of teaching apiaries. Queen rearing facility in teaching apiaries. Queen rearing as a collective exercise. Producing bees and queens, yet still getting a good honey crop. Including queen rearing […]

Bucks Berks & Oxon Bee Improvement (BBOBI ) – RG9

[…]able to modify temperament. It was therefore proposed to give away marked virgin queens during 2019 to anyone prepared to monitor and record their progress over 2 years and to record their results on a group app called Hivelog. Any beekeepers with queens demonstrating good temperament would be asked to add a frame of drone comb in year two and […]
Read more » Bucks Berks & Oxon Bee Improvement (BBOBI ) – RG9

BBOBI Group – April 2020 Newsletter

[…]than knocking them back an artificial swarm procedure.  Save those queen cells, try making two frame nucs. You could also read up on the Miller Method, this is a good link: http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/millermethod.html Keep an eye on the What’sApp group, it is the best way to make cries for help. If you’re not included, email me your phone number to be added […]

News for Non-Members – June 2020

[…]research see what you can do with a nuc box learn about some BIBBA webinars the full article on nucs is available to BIBBA members at […]

Welcome to the October BM Newsletter by Karl Colyer

[…](example picture above) have been fed with 50kg of sugar in strong syrup form between the 1st and 27th September. The bees are very prolific – too prolific for the natural forage in leafy Cheshire. The other two hives were on National broods. Both colonies swarmed twice despite me taking a couple of frames away from one of them to […]
Read more » Welcome to the October BM Newsletter by Karl Colyer

Cupkit, Fakes and Annoyance

[…]– in use they get mixed up – so, as I don’t like wasting things, I nailed a bar in the frame so that if the cage did fall off it would be restricted and wouldn’t release the queen (Fig. 2). I have acquired “Cupkit” parts from several sources.  These have meant that I have many poorly fitting parts.  I […]

Richard Senior

[…]his love of bees with his love for teaching.  Richard started his beekeeping journey with a nuc of bees in 2006 after a 6-week local association beginners’ course and over the years has gradually expanded to 50 colonies. Proud to be the current chairman of Barnsley Beekeepers Association, Richard is a strong believer in locally produced bees and queens (in small […]

Colony Increase – The Roger Patterson Method

[…]everything very pragmatically and makes no drama of the process, or needing piles of kit. A few nuc boxes and a strong colony is all that’s really required.Rogers hints and tips as you read through make perfect sense. This is a great addition to any Beekeepers reading, and can hopefully prevent needless imports of colonies when we can do this, […]
Read more » Colony Increase – The Roger Patterson Method