BIM 49 – Spring 2017

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

BIM 49 – Spring 2017

  • From the President – Jo Widdicombe
    I like to do a spot check to see roughly what percentage are of native appearance. The figure goes up and down a bit according to who has what bees in the area.
  • 53 AGM Notice
  • Trials and Tribulations – Frank Hilton
    The regeneration of the black bee would eliminate the necessity to import bees from abroad…
  • Are you a Natural Beekeeper? – Brian Dennis
    So what is a natural beekeeper? The term ‘natural beekeeper’ is an oxymoron. A dictionary definition of natural is ‘existing in or caused by nature, not artificial’.
  • Natural Beekeeping – Philip Denwood
    A few natural beekeepers are simply providingsites for bee colonies to occupy, as they might put up bat boxes or bird nesting boxes.
  • Racial Profiling of Mongrels – Paul Honigmann
    Colour and size variation is apparent …
  • Future Bee Improvement and QR – R Patterson
    These courses are very popular, with lots of information and tips on improving your own and your local bees.
  • History of Manx beekeeping – Cilla Platt
    Beekeeping started even before the Irish gods were told to find an island to go into exile.
  • Making Increase – Brian Dennis
    There are bad tempered bees, which should not be tolerated…
  • Locally Adapted Bees – Wally Shaw
    The natural distribution of A.m.m. starts north of the Pyrenees in France, spreading north into most of Western Europe. . .
  • Bee Races & Protected Areas in Switzerland – Balser & Padruot Fried
    The search for ‘better’ bees (more honey and/or swarms) began already in the late 19th century.
  • B4 Press Release – Plymouth University
    B4 and staff at Plymouth University are about to embark on an exciting new project that will investigate local adaptation in UK populations of dark honey bee.
  • SICAMM Conference – Eoghan Mac Giolla Coda
    Over 60 delegates from 15 countries met at De Werelt Conference Centre in Lunteren for the latest SICAMM conference
  • Intelligence v. Chemical Responses – Brian Dennis
    Brood recognition pheromone is produced by larvae and pupae and helps nurse bees distinguish between worker and drone larvae and pupae
  • This is a non-smoking area – Brian Dennis
    Gently smoke the entrance to the hive. The smell of smoke causes the bees to fill themselves up with honey … and this renders them much more amenable to handling …
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